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The Führerbunker.

Article about: Actually Berlin is full of WWII traces if You will go for example to the older parts of the city (Prenzlauer Berg for example). I have been there many times and almost every pre 1945 house s

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    Default The Führerbunker.

    A few shots of the snowy Führerbunker site taken at the beginning of last December......
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Berlin 2010 192.jpg   Berlin 2010 189.jpg  

    Berlin 2010 188.jpg   Berlin 2010 190.jpg  


  2. #2

    Default Re: The Führerbunker.

    Nice shots Adrian ! I was watching Downfall yesterday.. again !! Its difficult to picture that scene 66 years ago !!!

    I also backed to back Valkyrie and A Woman In Berlin with it !! A great days viewing!

    Nick
    "In all my years as a soldier, I have never seen men fight so hard." - SS Obergruppenfuhrer Wilhelm Bittrich - Arnhem

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    Default Re: The Führerbunker.

    Quote by Stickgrenade View Post
    Its difficult to picture that scene 66 years ago !!!
    To be honest Nick it is difficult to picture the scene or get a feeling of history there. I think because it is just an ordinary parking lot for the flats behind - which could be anywhere - it's very hard to get any sense of the events that happened on that spot. If it wasn't for the sign telling you where you are, you could be in any car park in any city.

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    Default Re: The Führerbunker.

    I watched downfall aswell just about two weeks ago! Good movie, there isint many that show it from the german side of view.

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    Default Re: The Führerbunker.

    Quote by Adrian View Post
    To be honest Nick it is difficult to picture the scene or get a feeling of history there. I think because it is just an ordinary parking lot for the flats behind - which could be anywhere - it's very hard to get any sense of the events that happened on that spot. If it wasn't for the sign telling you where you are, you could be in any car park in any city.
    Indeed, nowadays there are few places in germany where you can still get a felling of history. Concentration camps are probably the few places where you can still feel that.
    Other places are eather completely destroyed or turned in to car parks.
    Cheers.
    nuno

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    Default Re: The Führerbunker.

    It is a shame that more of the history of the places has not been preserved. The more it gets wiped out the more we forget

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    Default Re: The Führerbunker.

    I was watching some program on the history channel about the ''wolfs lair bunker" there seems to be a lot of that site left.The commentator said that there was a spray painted sign on the wall that said 'The fuhrer will live in our hearts forever' .When was spray paint developed!!!!

  8. #8

    Default Re: The Führerbunker.

    It was used in WW2, aircraft were spray painted

    Nick
    "In all my years as a soldier, I have never seen men fight so hard." - SS Obergruppenfuhrer Wilhelm Bittrich - Arnhem

  9. #9

    Default Re: The Führerbunker.

    I mean the spray aerosol can.It was sprayed in a bright orange.The point I was making was that someone painted this long after the war ended,at least that what the commentator said.

  10. #10

    Default Re: The Führerbunker.

    Quote by operaman View Post
    I was watching some program on the history channel about the ''wolfs lair bunker" there seems to be a lot of that site left.The commentator said that there was a spray painted sign on the wall that said 'The fuhrer will live in our hearts forever' .When was spray paint developed!!!!
    The beginnings of spray paint can be traced back to the 1920s, and possibly earlier. The term “aerosol bomb” originated with the very first portable spray can, which was originally shaped like a 19th-century fuse bomb (like in the old Rocky and Bullwinkle cartoons). Containing a foul-smelling oil, the ZACO can was extremely well engineered and made of heavy-gauge steel. The nozzle had a small knurled brass knob incorporated in it that was turned on or off simply by screwing it clockwise or counterclockwise. Specific industrial use of this same nozzle design can be dated to 1942, thanks to its inclusion in a government-issued photo of a woman demonstrating an aerosol insect spray. As with most technological advances at the time, World War II greatly influenced the development and introduction of the push-button spray can. Malaria and other insect-borne diseases were wreaking havoc on American troops, so a portable repellent had to be developed. Due to the use of these insecticides during WWII, the first real advances were made in the portable spray can.

    The various technologies that emerged during wartime were quickly retooled and adapted for domestic use. In 1946, the Continental Can Company in New York created the first “push-button” portable spray can. They marketed it to any company that could apply it to their products: makers of pesticides, car wax, household deodorizers, and various other projects. The following year, Krylon adopted the push-button spray can as a delivery system for clear acrylic spray fixative (meant to protect artwork and print advertisements). By the end of the decade, Krylon had developed a totally new can design and was quickly becoming the leading innovator in the industry. However, there was still a key technical advancement missing from the formula.

    Crown Holdings Inc. was already a major player in the aerosol business when, in 1952, they introduced the “Spra-tainer,” a lightweight, two-piece “no side seam, no top seam” aerosol can. Krylon adopted the can as the final piece of what would become the modern push-button spray nozzle we know today.

    Hope this helps.
    Eric

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