Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 50

Iconic Normandy photo's Robert Capa's Then and Now.

Article about: by Adrian I hadn't seen this thread before either, a good set of comparison photos, thanks for taking the time to share them. Blume, do know more about this particular prisoner? Unfortunatel

  1. #11

    Default Re: Iconic Normandy photo's Robert Capa's Then and Now.

    This is a great thread. I know it's old but I really appreciate the effort you put into this.


    LOOKING FOR:
    Functioning No. 4 Mk I or Mk I* Enfield Rifle
    Japanese Type 90 Helmet
    Functioning M1 Carbine or M1 Garand
    Soviet WWII-era M35 or M43 Gymnasterka
    Wound Badge in Black marked '65' in any condition!

  2. #12

    Default Re: Iconic Normandy photo's Robert Capa's Then and Now.

    I agree, it is sweet to see such photos! I like how a lot of the landscape has remained over the years. Nice not to see greedy developers ruining important historical sites.

  3. #13
    ?

    Default Re: Iconic Normandy photo's Robert Capa's Then and Now.

    The SS prisoners just been captured were in Notre Dame de Cenilly (Manche) Normandy. And then?
    How do you think about? They were prisoners of war, an then? The young SS Officier is survivor at the war, he is died in a prisoner camp? He was involved and processed for war crimes?

    Blume

  4. #14

    Default Re: Iconic Normandy photo's Robert Capa's Then and Now.

    Quote by blume View Post
    The SS prisoners just been captured were in Notre Dame de Cenilly (Manche) Normandy. And then?
    How do you think about? They were prisoners of war, an then? The young SS Officier is survivor at the war, he is died in a prisoner camp? He was involved and processed for war crimes?

    Blume
    I doubt he died in a POW camp, as the U.S. treated their prisoners well, unlike some. I also doubt as if he was tried for war crimes either, as he was not an official.

  5. #15

    Default Re: Iconic Normandy photo's Robert Capa's Then and Now.

    Unfortunately, the US did not Always treat their SS prisoners well-such as in the Dachau incident or the bread fiasco. But, you're right. I very much doubt that being a simple fighting soldier that he was in any trouble once he was in custody. And a wounded one, no less. He was such an iconic photographic subject, though, that I've often wondered myself over the years what ever was his final disposition. Probably gone by now anyway, but it would have been fascinating to know how he ended up and who he was.
    And, yes, by the way, I've always been amazed at the then and now photos. It's things like these that bring History home to a person! Hope we'll be seeing alot more of the same!
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  6. #16
    ?

    Default Re: Iconic Normandy photo's Robert Capa's Then and Now.

    Quote by blume View Post
    The SS prisoners just been captured were in Notre Dame de Cenilly (Manche) Normandy. And then?
    How do you think about? They were prisoners of war, an then? The young SS Officier is survivor at the war, he is died in a prisoner camp? He was involved and processed for war crimes?

    Blume
    I hadn't seen this thread before either, a good set of comparison photos, thanks for taking the time to share them.

    Blume, do know more about this particular prisoner?
    Best Regards,
    Adrian.



    Looking for LDO marked EK2s and items relating to U-406.....

  7. #17
    ?

    Default Re: Iconic Normandy photo's Robert Capa's Then and Now.

    Quote by Good Pwny View Post
    I doubt he died in a POW camp, as the U.S. treated their prisoners well, unlike some. I also doubt as if he was tried for war crimes either, as he was not an official.
    Sorry, but if you look the picture you can see the collar tabs, there are of an Officer, an SS- Untersturmfuher!The French author Jean Claude Perrigault identifies the SS-Untersturmführer as Kurt Peters of III.Battalion/SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment 37 (17.SS-Panzergrenadier-Division Götz von Berlichingen).

    Blume

  8. #18
    ?

    Default Re: Iconic Normandy photo's Robert Capa's Then and Now.

    Quote by Wagriff View Post
    Unfortunately, the US did not Always treat their SS prisoners well-such as in the Dachau incident or the bread fiasco. But, you're right. I very much doubt that being a simple fighting soldier that he was in any trouble once he was in custody. And a wounded one, no less. He was such an iconic photographic subject, though, that I've often wondered myself over the years what ever was his final disposition. Probably gone by now anyway, but it would have been fascinating to know how he ended up and who he was.
    And, yes, by the way, I've always been amazed at the then and now photos. It's things like these that bring History home to a person! Hope we'll be seeing alot more of the same!
    Yeah, not all was roses in the aftermath. The handing over of POVs to the Russians least of all.
    But please tell us more of the Dachau and the bread incident.
    Are you talking about where they let KZ inmates tear some guards apart or what?

  9. #19
    ?

    Default Re: Iconic Normandy photo's Robert Capa's Then and Now.

    I just found this interesting article while seaching the officer's name:

    'The U.S. Army Military Policeman Lt. Paul Unger of the 2nd Armoured Division frisking an Offizier of the Waffen-SS during Operation Cobra. The French author Jean Claude Perrigault identifies the SS-Untersturmführer as Kurt Peters of III.Battalion/SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment 37 (17.SS-Panzergrenadier-Division Götz von Berlichingen).
    Even the official history acknowledges widespread looting by American GIs during WWII. Allied soldiers took every Iron Cross off the Axis Prisoners of War that they could get their hands on. The ultimate souvenirs was no doubt various insignia and decorations of the feared Waffen-SS. The following text is from the author and historian Mark Bando's official website Trigger Time:
    "A convoy carrying 1/506th troops paused for a rest break. Other troops had rounded-up some prisoners, who were standing at the side of the highway. Amongst them was a haughty-looking SS Sgt, wearing the double runic lightning flash collar patch. Judging from the amount of wear and dirt on the tab, the sgt was probably a veteran/survivor of many battles. Robert Wiatt of C/506th wanted to find out just how tough the SS Sgt really was. He walked over, drew his M-3 trench knife from his ankle and held it to the German's throat. As he did that, his buddy Ken Parker ran around behind the German and grasped his arms. The SS trooper maintained his calm and remained standing at attention, staring straight ahead. Wiatt used his knife to remove the collar patch for a souvenir."
    Image taken in Notre-Dame-de-Cenilly, South West of Saint-Lô, between July 27 – 29 1944 by Robert Capa.'
    Best Regards,
    Adrian.



    Looking for LDO marked EK2s and items relating to U-406.....

  10. #20

    Default Re: Iconic Normandy photo's Robert Capa's Then and Now.

    Here is another picture, he doesnt look happy !

    Nick
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture CapturedGermanSSofficer.jpeg  
    "In all my years as a soldier, I have never seen men fight so hard." - SS Obergruppenfuhrer Wilhelm Bittrich - Arnhem

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •