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Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

Article about: by ZigZag I read that all the soldiers in camps in Ireland..both Allied and German were allowed to leave the camps and go into the towns and pubs and just walk around. Is this true? Re Post

  1. #11

    Default Re: Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

    Quote by ZigZag View Post
    I read that all the soldiers in camps in Ireland..both Allied and German were allowed to leave the camps and go into the towns and pubs and just walk around. Is this true?
    Re Post #3.

    Even better than that.....

    "However, all was not doom and gloom in County Kildare. It is a well-known fact that the internees were allowed sign out to attend horse racing at the Curragh, to attend public dances in Newbridge and to visit the German Embassy in Dublin and to attend Trinity College. Indeed while attending the German Embassy both Kurt Mollenhauer and Kurt Kyck met their future Irish wives."
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  2. #12

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    The grave place of the pilot who crashed in Kenmare bay, now in Glencree, Co. Wicklow.

    My friend visited Glencree posted this on the WAF, all credit goes to him:
    "I paid a visit to the German Military Graveyard in Glencree, Co. Wicklow earlier on today and whilst there I took some photographs for the forum. My primary reason for going there was to see the grave of the airman which started this thread.

    These Luftwaffe personnel are all buried in Glencree. Buried here also are a number of Kriegsmarine whose bodies were found washed up, sometimes in remote coastal locations. Fifty three of the air and naval service men buried in Glencree have identities while twenty eight others will never be known.

    Forty six were German civilian detainees, who were being shipped from Britain to Canada for internment when their ship, SS Arandora Star was torpedoed by a German U-boat, U-47, off Tory Island, County Donegal, on July 1940. A spy named Dr. Hermann Gortz, who took his own life to avoid arrest as a spy was buried in Glencree too. Six soldiers of the First World War are also buried here.

    ( 134 remains are buried here. 6 of the remains are from WW I and the remaining 128 from WW II.)

    The graveyard was very peaceful and tranquil which is to be expected but I thought I would give a little information about this setting too. The general layout is fan shaped with eight curved pathways. Alongside the pathways the graves are laid out. The remains are buried in pairs with the names of the two individuals buried within the grave marked on a flat stone cross. At least this is the case with some of the graves as many of them contain unidentified remains. I got some photographs of the landscaped graveyard which used to be a quarry. Alongside it runs a small river which is called the Glencree River. You can hear the noise of the water cascading along its route.

    I think the next set of photographs will compliment the human story. "

  3. #13

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    "Path leading up to the Grotto"

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    - - ------- - -

    " The Glencree River to the right of the grotto. "

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  4. #14

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    In front of the grotto.

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  5. #15

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    "From the rear looking back. "

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  6. #16

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    "A poem set in polished stone close by the entrance articulates the poignancy of Glencree and while I was standing there reading the poem a robin red breast landed on top of it to look at me. "

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  7. #17

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    "The following words are written by Professor Stan O’Brien, a dedicated supporter of the Irish German Society. These are the words written on the polished stone by the entrance.

    It was for me to die
    under an Irish sky.

    There finding berth
    In good Irish Earth.

    What I dreamed and planned
    bound me to my Fatherland.

    But war sent me to sleep in Glencree.

    Passion and pain
    Were my loss my gain.

    Pray as you pass to make good my loss. "

  8. #18

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    The grave of the pilot who crashed into Kenmare bay.Click image for larger version. 

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    Feldwebel Friedrich Schutz.

  9. #19

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    Thanks for the update Pat.
    Had good advice? Saved money? Why not become a Gold Club Member, just hit the green "Join WRF Club" tab at the top of the page and help support the forum!

  10. #20

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    I walked up mt Brandon via the pilgrims path in 2000, there was still some wreckage around to be found.

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