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Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

Article about: by ZigZag I read that all the soldiers in camps in Ireland..both Allied and German were allowed to leave the camps and go into the towns and pubs and just walk around. Is this true? Re Post

  1. #1

    Default Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

    Wing debris from Luftwaffe Focke Wulf 200 Condor air crash site. Mount Brandon, Dingle Peninsula, in County Kerry Ireland. This is'nt my photo, but I think there are still some remains on Mount Brandon. I know a pub has the engine being used as a table.
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    Some luftwaffe and kriegsmarine soldiers in an Irish Internment camp. These soldiers were given £2-£3 a week to buy things like clothes. A lot of these soldiers married and stayed here in Ireland.
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  2. #2

    Default Re: Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

    Great images Pat! Thank you

    I love this subject, there are two recent books out detailing UK crashes

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_...ripbooks%2C444

    Nick
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture LW Crashes.jpg  
    "In all my years as a soldier, I have never seen men fight so hard." - SS Obergruppenfuhrer Wilhelm Bittrich - Arnhem

  3. #3

    Default Re: Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

    Regarding the "Condor" incident on Mt.Brandon, here is the minutae with thanks to the Warplane Research Group of Ireland.

    QUOTE:

    'Luftwaffe Focke Wulf 200 ''Condor'' of KG40 departed Bordeaux in Western France on the morning of the 20th of August, 1940, to carry out weather reconnaissance and pressure readings off the north west coast of Ireland. As the huge 4 engine aircraft with a crew of 6 straddled the coastline of Mayo, Galway and Clare it developed engine problems and the pilot decided to try and return home. The problems intensified and therefore a decision was made to force land the aircraft at sea rather than attempt to land in the dense fog not knowing exactly where they were. Through the mist one of the crew could just make out Tralee Bay and in particular ''Hogs Head''. The pilot, Captain Kurt Mollenhauer, from Cuxhaven, set course due west as the aircraft began to descend in dense fog.




    Little did anyone on board realize they were heading for Mount Brandon. On the ground, young Seán O' Dowd was helping to cut reeds and was startled to hear the roar of a very big aircraft as it seemed to pass over his head in the dense fog. He thought at the time that it would not get over Brandon at such a low altitude and he was partially correct. Back on board, Mollenhauer was startled to observe mountain moor-land rushes coming up to greet him as his aircraft virtually belly landed on top of Faha Ridge, below Mount Brandon. Four of the crew suffered broken limbs while two were unscathed. With the ridge encased in thick fog, Mollenhauer decided that they should carry the more seriously injured in a life raft to a lower altitude.




    In the village of An Clochán (Cloghane), the alarm had been raised and scores of local people and a member of the Gárda Síochána were making their way towards the beginning of ‘The Pilgrims Path’. As the aircrew, en masse, approached O' Connors farm they were met by a Miss O' Connor who handed Mollenhauer a jug of milk and said ''Sláinte''. This gesture verified to the aircraft Captain that they had landed in neutral Eire (his words) and he felt very safe. The Gárda based in Cloghane notified his superiors in Tralee and they in turn notified the Army in Ballymullen Barracks. A detachment of the 15th Infantry Battalion was on hand at Cloghane to officially welcome the crew to Ireland. It was decided to take three of the crew to St. Catherine’s Hospital in Tralee while the remainder were taken to Collins Barracks, in Cork, where they were arrested and detained. Since the Curragh Internment Camp had not yet been built, there was consternation in Cork not knowing what to do with the three German prisoners. A rather unsure Army Officer was instructed to phone Army Headquarters in Parkgate in Dublin and explain his predicament to an unnamed voice who did not identify himself immediately. The young officer asked the pertinent question. Sir: Do we hold them or do we shoot them. He was instructed to detain them indefinitely by the unnamed voice, Prime Minster Eamonn De Valera.




    Back in Tralee, the nursing staff treated Mollenhauer and his two colleagues most cordially where they were detained for six weeks. Each night they were given a bottle of Guinness to help them sleep. During their forced detention in Tralee and Cork, the Curragh Internment Camp was being made ready and at the end of September, 1940, it opened for business. Captain Mollenhaur, Radio Operator Kyck and their four colleagues had the unenviable honour of becoming neutral Ireland’s first internees. However, all was not doom and gloom in County Kildare. It is a well-known fact that the internees were allowed sign out to attend horse racing at the Curragh, to attend public dances in Newbridge and to visit the German Embassy in Dublin and to attend Trinity College. Indeed while attending the German Embassy both Kurt Mollenhauer and Kurt Kyck met their future Irish wives. On the 20th of August, 1990, Victor Sullivan, Frank Donaldson, Gary Johnson, Sean O' Dowd and myself (Gerard O' Regan) were on hand to greet Kurt Kyck and Kurt Mollenhauer and their wives back to Cloghane and to O'Connor's farm near ‘The Pilgrims Path’ where they met Miss O'Connor again, 50 years exactly since she handed him the jug of milk. At the time of writing this, in 2004, Kurt Mollenhauer is deceased while Kurt Kyck resides in eastern Ireland.'

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

    Great information Ned.

    Pat

  5. #5

    Default Re: Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

    Here's a photo of what is today accepted as being the FW 200C Condor F8+KH Werke Nr. 00015, that crashed on Faha ridge, Mt.Brandon. This was deduced by a couple of data plates recovered in recent years and the fact that no trace of F8+KH can be found in records after August 20th 1940.

    Ned.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture 1-Fw-200C-Condor-1_KG40-(F8+KH)-in-flight-1940-01.jpg  
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  6. #6
    ?

    Default Re: Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

    Interesting thread Patrick, is this near where you live? Thanks for the added information Ned.

    Regards,

    Carl
    Experienced guide and published author leading detailed study trips to the former KZ sites of Nazi Germany. Contact for further details.

    www.concentrationcamptours.com

    www.concentrationcampmoney.com


    "maka akaŋl oyate maŋi pi ki le, tuweŋi wíyópeya oki hi sni"

  7. #7

    Default Re: Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

    Yeah I can see Mount Brandon from my house.

    Cheers, Pat

  8. #8

    Default Re: Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

    A funeral for a Luftwaffe soldier who crashed in Kenmare bay but he didn't survive.

    The plane that is thought to have crashed into Kenmare Bay was a HE111P "1G+LS" of 8./KG27 . The HE111 took heavy fire from British fishing trawlers working out of Milford Haven, Wales . There were a total of five trawlers in the fleet and all were armed with .303 Lewis guns , The two fishing trawlers that shot at the HE111 were the Grackle and Dandara. After sustaining the damage the HE111 headed towards the southwest coast of Ireland.

    The crew of the HE111 were as follows, Fw.Arnold Putz - Pilot, Oblt.Konrad Hafele - Observer, Fw. Werner Seegner - Radio Operator and Fw.Friedrich Schulz- Flight Mechanic.

    Only the body of Fw. Friedrich Schulz was recovered when it was spotted floating in Kenmare Bay by two local fishermen. Fw. Schulz died from exposure and not injuries from combat or the crash landing.

    Fw. Schulz was given a full military burial and buried in Holy Cross Cemetery, Kenmare, Co.Kerry.

    Between 1956 and 1960 all the German service men that were buried in various cemeteries around Ireland were dug up and buried in the German Military Graveyard in Glencree, Co. Wicklow.

    Here are some photographs of Fw. Friedrich Schulz funeral. The LDF gave him a guard of honour.

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  9. #9

    Default Re: Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

    Ned,have you ever thought of going on eggheads.

  10. #10
    ?

    Default Re: Luftwaffe remains on Mount Brandon, Ireland.

    I read that all the soldiers in camps in Ireland..both Allied and German were allowed to leave the camps and go into the towns and pubs and just walk around. Is this true?

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