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Malayan tribal machete

Article about: I got this piece from former AAC helicopter pilot Dick Kalinski who flew missions in Borneo in support of SAS troops, and was given to the pilot by an SAS trooper in theatre. It is a hand ma

  1. #1

    Default Malayan tribal machete

    I got this piece from former AAC helicopter pilot Dick Kalinski who flew missions in Borneo in support of SAS troops, and was given to the pilot by an SAS trooper in theatre. It is a hand made tribal (I think Iban) machete with wooden hand carved sheath. I particularly like the woven grass detail, which is there for nothing other than decoration I also have a standard issue 1960's British machete from the same source in pretty rough shape.

    Interesting is the 22 marking, which I have always assumed to be related to 22 SAS. Perhaps done by the individual trooper to whom it belonged, or maybe the SAS had a batch of these made by a local craftsman and had the markings added at the time?

    Enjoy

    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2

    Default Re: Malayan tribal machete

    Really nobody interested in this one? I think it is pretty cool.

  3. #3
    ?

    Default Re: Malayan tribal machete

    Never seen one before. Shape is well designed for work.
    I would hate to be on the recieving end of such a weapon.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Malayan tribal machete

    Hi KS,

    The knife is commonly known as a Golok and is of Indonesian origins. In Malaya they were more often known as a Parang and the 1950's pattern British Army type machete was based on the design (they were often called 'tree beaters' as they were not considered the best blades for cutting through jungle!) The indiginous original shape was far better for cutting through green timber due to the tapered shape of the blade and the fact that it could be sharpened like a razor because the blade was flexible low carbon steel. This meant it had to be sharpened regularly.

    The one you show was, and still is, very popular with SF on secondment to jungle enviroments. My father, who was posted to Malaya in the early 50's on armoured cars, well remembers SAS wallahs using them. He said the 'Shhh, Shhh' noise of the troopers sharpening them in camp in the middle of the night made his blood run cold!!

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Malayan tribal machete

    Great info Ned thanks a lot!

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