Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Bf-109

Article about: Many LW aircraft types had this spiral art on the spinner. I have seen images of a Spitfire and some modern aircraft with it too. I think Eric is correct, it indicates movement of the prop a

  1. #1
    ?

    Default Bf-109

    What purpose did the spiral painted on the nosecones of the BF 109 serve?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	me109_01.jpg 
Views:	7569 
Size:	41.8 KB 
ID:	416062

  2. #2

    Default Re: Bf-109

    To make one aware on the ground of stantionary movement of the prop?

    Eric
    [h=3]e plu·ri·bus u·num[/h]

  3. #3
    ?

    Default Re: Bf-109

    ....or just distinctive personal or 'Staffel' decoration. A German tradition.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Bf-109

    True scout! good point.

    Eric
    [h=3]e plu·ri·bus u·num[/h]

  5. #5
    ?

    Default Re: Bf-109

    I thought it was odd, as no other Luftwaffe aircraft I know of has it.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Bf-109

    It would serve no purpose in the air IMO at that RPM...

    Eric
    [h=3]e plu·ri·bus u·num[/h]

  7. #7

    Default Re: Bf-109

    Fw 190's carried the same spinner paint.
    I am pretty sure they were a personal or Staffel Thing.No real purpose other than looks.
    Cheers
    Dave

  8. #8
    ?

    Default Re: Bf-109

    Quote by Eric Zentner View Post
    True scout! good point.

    Eric
    Thank you.

    I thought your suggestion valid as well, considering the racket going on at the airfields and that ground personnel might be wearing hearing protection.

    I still lean towards the painted spinners being an expression of either personal or Staffel/Geschwader markings.

    BTW I stumbled over this paintjob page, which I found interesting. Amazing, if the Cramon-Traubadel story is true.
    http://www.ipmsstockholm.org/magazin...file_bf109.htm

  9. #9
    ?

    Default Re: Bf-109

    Quote by Eric Zentner View Post
    It would serve no purpose in the air IMO at that RPM...

    Eric
    I agree.

    There are some outlandish (but highly entertaining) suggestions out there; that it was for psychological reasons to freak out the enemy pilots in aerial battles, to confuse enemy anti-aircraft crews or even to ward off birds by scaring them thus warding off bird strikes.

    Obviously suggestions by people, who didnt think it through and/or who have never seen a painted spinner nor considered the implications of fighters manouvering at flying speed or the ramifications of planes in fast and furious air battles.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Bf-109

    At warm-up or taxiing speeds the spiral is clearly visible - less so obviously at full throttle so I would concur that this was to minimise a messy incident.
    The same reason is valid for the yellow painted prop tips on allied fighters and bombers.

    A well known Aussie golfer, Jack Newton found out the hard way about spinning props back in 1983 ( lost one arm, one eye and severe injuries but he survived )

    Dan
    " When you're chewing on life's gristle, don't grumble, give a whistle "

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •