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Bristol Blenheim Crash Relic

Article about: Hello folks. I've always had a passion for aircraft relics, particularly those related to the Ju-87 Stuka. At last, I've branched into Allied aircraft parts, and I'm rather pleased with my f

  1. #1

    Default Bristol Blenheim Crash Relic

    Hello folks.

    I've always had a passion for aircraft relics, particularly those related to the Ju-87 Stuka. But at last, I've branched into Allied aircraft parts, and I'm rather pleased with my first one.

    This large panel, approximately 27x16 inches, was salvaged from the wreckage of a Bristol Blenheim Mk.IV light bomber, serial T1851, part of 107 Squadron RAF. It was brought down under uncertain circumstances -- though it is most likely to have been shot down by anti-aircraft fire -- on 9th September 1940, near the village of Hesdin, Northern France. The aircraft took off from RAF Wattisham at 3:25 AM, flying out on a night raid to target ports and barges in Ostend, Belgium.

    The panel is crumpled from the impact of the crash, and appears to be lightly burned. But most of the camouflage paint survives, with the stripe between the RAF green and brown clearly visible. Most of the rivets have been ripped out, but a few have survived.

    Bristol Blenheim Crash RelicBristol Blenheim Crash RelicBristol Blenheim Crash RelicBristol Blenheim Crash RelicBristol Blenheim Crash Relic

    It was one of two aircraft from 107 Squadron lost that night. The following are the names of the crewmen from the aircraft this relic was salvaged from:

    PILOT: Pilot Officer Charles De Vic Halkett, 43704 RAF, aged 25

    OBSERVER: Sergeant Alec Victor Jacobs, 755443 RAFVR, aged 21

    OPERATOR/GUNNER: Sergeant James Harley Easton, 755173 RAFVR, aged 21

    Their final resting places photographed below. All three men are buried side by side in the graveyard of Wambercourt Church, France.

    Bristol Blenheim Crash Relic

    A photograph of a Blenheim Mk.IV, and a portrait picture of Pilot Officer Charles De Vic Halkett.

    Bristol Blenheim Crash Relic

    A map, showing the location of the crash site and the final resting places of the crewmen.

    Bristol Blenheim Crash Relic

    And finally, a Google Maps link to the field the aircraft came down in. A serene, beautiful place today: Google Maps

    All information and photographs contained within this thread, other than my own, come from this site: 107 Squadron Blenheim IV T1831 P/O. Halkett

    Regards, B.B.
    ''Everyday you think of living. We are born to die, but I appreciate life. We live day by day, and I always say: yesterday is history, today's reality, and tomorrow's a dream.' -- Henry Flescher, Holocaust Survivor -- March 14, 1924 - August 29, 2018

  2. #2

    Default

    What am amazing piece of history Brodie!

    It really brings this tragic story to life to see the camo'd paint on the panel and the forces placed upon it from the impact.

    Do you know when this piece was recovered and repatriated?
    Andy

  3. #3

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    Greta history and a interesting item. Nice work!
    John

  4. #4

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    Quote by AndyM35 View Post
    What am amazing piece of history Brodie!

    It really brings this tragic story to life to see the camo'd paint on the panel and the forces placed upon it from the impact.

    Do you know when this piece was recovered and repatriated?
    Andy
    I don’t know exactly when it was recovered, unfortunately. But the dealer I purchased it from is one that I trust, and that I’ve bought other aircraft relics from before. It’s been above ground for quite some time, I’d guess. There are cobwebs inside the crumpled section, and the paint that hasn’t been charred is in very good shape, so it was probably recovered from the site not long after the crash, and kept in a shed or outbuilding.

    I’m glad to have this piece in my collection. It’s a very humbling thing to hold in your hands, to say the least.

    Regards, B.B.
    ''Everyday you think of living. We are born to die, but I appreciate life. We live day by day, and I always say: yesterday is history, today's reality, and tomorrow's a dream.' -- Henry Flescher, Holocaust Survivor -- March 14, 1924 - August 29, 2018

  5. #5

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    Well it's in good hands!

    Andy

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