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Late war ME109G crash relics

Article about: A couple of years back I bought a group of relics from a Messerschmitt BF109G from member ‘Asperious’ but one thing led to another and I never showed them to the forum. Meantime though, I di

  1. #1

    Default Late war ME109G crash relics

    A couple of years back I bought a group of relics from a Messerschmitt BF109G from member ‘Asterperious ’ but one thing led to another and I never showed them to the forum. Meantime though, I did some research into the aircraft and pilot and their ultimate fate.

    Gefreiter Karl-Heinz Schöffmann of 3. Staffel JG300 was shot down & killed by US forces ground fire near Nordhausen on 27th November 1944. A bad day for the gruppe as it lost 23 aircraft between sun up and sun down!

    Prior to that day, Karl-Heinze had been lucky, he had been wounded in action on 18 July, 1944 during aerial combat but bailed safely east of Weilheim ( flying a 109G-6 ).

    2 weeks later ( the wounds must have been slight ) he was back in action and on 27th July at 1000hrs and flying at 6500metres north of Plattensee, he downed a B-24 Liberator – his first confirmed kill.

    Two months later ( again on the 27th at 1053hrs) his second kill was a P-51 Mustang at 8000m near Bad-Langensalza.
    Seems the 27th day of the month was his day ......... for a time.

    Another 2 months go by and on the SAME day his luck finally runs out and he falls in combat, the plane ( and him ) shattering to pieces on impact. A record I found stated that “his coffin only contained the left hand with a ring and sand”

    Karl-Heinz was holder of the EK1, EK2, wound badge and Fighter operational clasp.
    Another fallen young eagle for a mother to bury – and there were SO MANY from both sides…….

    next are some photos..
    Dan
    Last edited by Danmark; 05-16-2016 at 09:10 AM.
    " When you're chewing on life's gristle, don't grumble, give a whistle "

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    First relic is part of the canopy - this is the right rear portion.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture 20160516_093100.jpg   20160516_093122.jpg  

    163306.stbd.canopy_frame.jpg  
    " When you're chewing on life's gristle, don't grumble, give a whistle "

  3. #3
    MAP
    MAP is online now
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    Nice piece of history Dan!!
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

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    Next is the pitot tube - amazing that something like this survived. Obviously the plane did not go in nose first.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture 20160516_093149.jpg   20160516_093216.jpg  

    20160516_093252.jpg   20160516_093229.jpg  

    " When you're chewing on life's gristle, don't grumble, give a whistle "

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    I also got the oil cooler control valve from the DB605 engine - you can imagine the force of the impact from this.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is the ceramic isolator from the antenna

    Click image for larger version. 

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    " When you're chewing on life's gristle, don't grumble, give a whistle "

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    ..... and the fixture for holding the first aid satchel. ( not sure how it worked or where it was .... any help in that regard?)

    it does say "halterung fur sanitstache" on it..
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture 20160516_093310.jpg   20160516_093319.jpg  

    " When you're chewing on life's gristle, don't grumble, give a whistle "

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    Finally is the fuel cap - a little bent but all intact.

    Strangely, many of the parts seem to be in really good shape - either recovered at the time or something else?
    I know our fellow member is involved with the museum in Tuscon AZ and aircraft restoration so, a call out to Scott ( Asterperious ) if he recalls the story behind it all......... he probably explained it but my memory is like a sieve!!

    Hope you enjoyed the bits!
    Cheers, Dan
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture 20160516_124022.jpg   20160516_124010.jpg  

    Last edited by Danmark; 05-16-2016 at 09:16 AM.
    " When you're chewing on life's gristle, don't grumble, give a whistle "

  8. #8
    ?

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    Great items Denmark!!!!!
    Curious minds would like to know more!!!!!
    I hope he does chime in. Come on my AZ brother, Don't let me down.
    I would also like to know if he has done any work for the 390th over there?

    Semper Fi
    Phil

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    Great items Dan!
    Had good advice? Saved money? Why not become a Gold Club Member, just hit the green "Join WRF Club" tab at the top of the page and help support the forum!

  10. #10

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    Super stuff.
    |<
    Always looking for Belgian Congo stuff!
    cheers
    |<ris

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