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A little something in the Sahara!

Article about: I think it's worth adding the photos of Flight Sergeant Dennis Copping to the thread in case they disappear from the links provided.

  1. #51

    Default Re: A little something in the Sahara!

    They're getting close Burt, it's coded HS-B which is 260 Sqn. No serial number yet, but there is speculation out there that the pilot was a F/Sgt. missing on a flight to an RSU who was given the wrong co-ordinates and was lost. As there are over 20 allied aircraft still missing in the general area, including P-40's, it would be wrong to name him here. These aircraft often changed units, and the code could have vanished due to sand eroding the paint and revealing a former Sqn. code.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  2. #52

    Default Re: A little something in the Sahara!

    An amazing find, especially in this day and age! The condition of the aircraft is very telling. I'm guessing that it wasn't discovered until very recently? Even the guns and ammo are still on board. Is it possible that perhaps the aircraft was buried in a sandstorm and that is what kept it hidden all these years? It just seems odd that it wasn't stripped down by the local people, which is why I'm theorizing perhaps it was buried in sand until recently.

  3. #53

  4. #54

    Default Re: A little something in the Sahara!

    Hi,

    Whether, do the RAF know about the discovery? I hope the pilot survived the incident and he has been rescued. I hope very much.
    I was interested in the story of Lady Be Good in detail for years. Her crews' fate is very-very moving and sad.
    And now, here is another one, which seems very same event. A parachute which was used a shelter, probably..... A removed radio transmitter....
    I think, should be search the vicinity of the P-40.

    Bests,

    Gabor

  5. #55
    ?

    Default Re: A little something in the Sahara!

    Chute, radio etc might have been scattered around the plane by scavengers or whom ever. We just dont know.

  6. #56

  7. #57
    ?

    Default Re: A little something in the Sahara!

    Speaking of the Lady Be Good; too bad, that it was not preserved in the state it was found in the desert.
    (plane was cracked in the middle but was fully stocked with equipment. Machine guns still worked. It is assumed, that the Lady Be Good flew on after the crew parachuted out of it and relatively gentle belly landed in the desert).
    The previous Libyan regime had it transported to Tobruk. Judging from pics, the wreck has suffered severe damage even ripped down one side, as can be seen in the pics. Sad - it would have made an interesting display in a museum.
    The crew all perished in the desert most likely not knowing how far inland they were. They all perished after walking a distance in the desert. Tragically, had they been going in another direction, they could have reached an oasis walking the same amount of miles, that they actually trekked in the other direction. Or they could have happened upon the wreck of the Lady Be Good with its stock of food and water and with a working radio.


  8. #58

    Default Re: A little something in the Sahara!

    Hi,

    I found some information about the plane and pilot on a forum site. Notes 49th and 59th are interesting. If it is true...

    P-40 found in the Sahara Desert - Page 3 - PPRuNe Forums

  9. #59

    Default Re: A little something in the Sahara!

    Here is what I found on the site of the Commonwealt War Grave Commission.

    COPPING, DENNIS CHARLES HUGHMORE

    Rank:
    Flight Sergeant
    Service No:
    785025
    Date of Death:
    28/06/1942
    Age:
    24
    Regiment/Service:
    Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

    260 Sqdn.
    Panel Reference
    Column 249.
    Memorial
    ALAMEIN MEMORIAL

    Additional Information:

    Son of Sydney Omer Copping and Adelaide Copping, of Southend-on-Sea, Essex.

  10. #60

    Default Re: A little something in the Sahara!

    Quote by gabor42 View Post
    Here is what I found on the site of the Commonwealt War Grave Commission.

    COPPING, DENNIS CHARLES HUGHMORE

    Rank:
    Flight Sergeant
    Service No:
    785025
    Date of Death:
    28/06/1942
    Age:
    24
    Regiment/Service:
    Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

    260 Sqdn.
    Panel Reference
    Column 249.
    Memorial
    ALAMEIN MEMORIAL

    Additional Information:

    Son of Sydney Omer Copping and Adelaide Copping, of Southend-on-Sea, Essex.
    Posting this information before anything is confirmed as to the identity of the pilot is poor drills. There are over 20 aircraft missing in that area including P-40's, that's at least 20 odd aircrew unaccounted for.

    How would you feel if a relative or loved one were missing for years and suddenly an irresponsible comment like the one above raises hopes that they may at last be found and given a decent burial, only to have your wishes crushed when it turns out to be someone else?

    Whilst the airman you have mentioned is a contender for the pilot of this aircraft, it has yet to be proven, but it will be as JCCC will be on the case already, make no mistake.

    So for the sake of NOK if any, it would have been best to keep comments as to the ASSUMED identity of the pilot to yourself before the facts are fully known.

    Sorry for the rant, but that's the way we do it over here.

    Ned.
    Last edited by big ned; 05-02-2012 at 10:42 AM.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

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