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My relic Panzerfaust

Article about: I don't normally buy relics, however, I have always been intrigued and wanted a Panzerfaust and knowing that I'll probably never be able to afford one in decent condition I broke the bank an

  1. #1

    Default My relic Panzerfaust

    I don't normally buy relics, however, I have always been intrigued and wanted a Panzerfaust and knowing that I'll probably never be able to afford one in decent condition I broke the bank and bought this rusty old tube for 27!
    It is a Panzerfaust 60 (going by the 5cm diameter) and I was surprised at how heavy it is. Although in obvious relic condition it is quite solid with mainly surface pitting and a few loose rust flakes.
    My questions are:
    1. Do I do anything to preserve it?
    2. If so, what do I use (oxalic acid)?
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  2. #2

    Default Re: My relic Panzerfaust

    Hard to do Oxalic as the item must be fully submerged. I would give it a hot, soapy water clean and a wax finish and leave the finish as it is.
    A word of caution ( as I have seen advised on this forum ) these contained a black powder charge that may still be active if the tube has not been fired. Has it been removed? - you should be able to see right through the tube if it has.

    Dan
    " When you're chewing on life's gristle, don't grumble, give a whistle "

  3. #3

    Default Re: My relic Panzerfaust

    The inside is completely clear of anything (and is in very good condition - a lot better than the outside). How corrosive is Oxalic? I was wondering whether it would fit in a plastic baby bath or plastic window sill planter/pot/box/thing

  4. #4

    Default Re: My relic Panzerfaust

    Oxalic is corrosive if left unwatched and dangerous as any acid is if treated incorrectly. There are numerous threads on here relating to its health risks if mucked about with - BUT, if one is sensible it DOES give results. A couple of pointers ( I've used it many times with good results )
    1) it DOES fade existing paint so don't leave the part submerged for ages.
    2) Protect your eyes, skin and lungs ( wear goggles, mask and gloves and do it outdoors )
    3) don't leave unattended - check hourly ( remove, wash and decide if enough cleaning has occurred )
    4) neutralise with water or baking soda ( an alkali )
    5) seal with something - wax, flat clear lacquer, fixative spray etc... ( NOT gloss )

    Good luck with it
    Dan
    " When you're chewing on life's gristle, don't grumble, give a whistle "

  5. #5

    Thumbs up

    Despite using the 'search' function ( obviously not very competently ) I didn't see this thread when posting pics of my own relic earlier today. Very interesting to see someone else pursuing the same theme, and also it's good that our hobby still doesn't have to break the bank-balance to produce rewarding and interesting items........

  6. #6

    Default

    If you don't want to use oxalic acid, (understandable given its dangers), and don't want to or can't set up an electrolysis tank big enough to take the relic, (a length of drainpipe cut in half and sealed at both ends works for items like this), the only other method is to use a wire brush attachment on an electric drill. This will remove all the surface rust, (as well as any paint or markings so be warned), and stabilist the relic. You can then scrub it with a soap filled scourer such as a Brillo pad, dry thoroughly, and then rub with wax or suitable oil to seal it against further corrosion.


  7. #7

  8. #8

    Default

    I feel that citric acid is also a very viable yet, strangely enough, often overlooked alternative to Oxalic. It's not dangerous and a lot gentler but still works really well... this would of course depend on how harsh the rust is though --- but, imo, definitely worth a try before experimenting with the potentially hazardous oxalic..

  9. #9

    Default

    Many thanks for the info - I still haven't done anything with it yet. It is quite stable and has obviously been 'dry' for some years (I say 'dry' as opposed to 'out of the ground' as it was allegedly found in a Normandy scrap yard many years ago - I think the 1980's, but I take it with a large pinch of salt as it came from an Ebay dealer). I have a old child's paddling pool (the shell type made out of very thick plastic) which I will probably use to bathe it, I'll wait until the summer though so that I can do it outside and let it dry properly.

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