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A Tempest from a shed in southern France

Article about: Hi, Everybody, I found this news recently. Great news, a great pilot, and a great warbird a Tempest will fly again. As I know, there is no Tempest Mk V in flying condition. Kiwi pilot relive

  1. #1

    Default A Tempest from a shed in southern France

    Hi, Everybody,

    I found this news recently. Great news, a great pilot, and a great warbird a Tempest will fly again. As I know, there is no Tempest Mk V in flying condition.

    Kiwi pilot relives wartime heroics in restored Tempest - Story - NZ News - 3 News



    and



    Kiwi pilot relives wartime heroics in restored Tempest - NZ News - Video - 3 News




    Cheers,

  2. #2

    Default Re: A Tempest from a shed in southern France

    This is exciting !

    I love this aircraft

    Nick
    "In all my years as a soldier, I have never seen men fight so hard." - SS Obergruppenfuhrer Wilhelm Bittrich - Arnhem

  3. #3

    Default Re: A Tempest from a shed in southern France

    Cool banana's.
    I just love these Hawker birds.The predesesor of the magnificant Tempest MKII and Sea Fury,The Bristol Centurus Radial in these later marks has to be one of the sweetest sounding powerplants ever made,they just crackle.
    Very very nice.
    Thanks for posting.
    Cheers
    Dave

  4. #4

    Default Re: A Tempest from a shed in southern France

    Very good.
    Had good advice? Saved money? Why not become a Gold Club Member, just hit the green "Join WRF Club" tab at the top of the page and help support the forum!

  5. #5
    ?

    Default Re: A Tempest from a shed in southern France

    This particular ex-Indian Air Force Tempest used to live at Spanhoe airfield, not far from me here, until it went to France in 1996.

  6. #6
    ?

    Default Re: A Tempest from a shed in southern France

    Pierre Closterman's book, THE BIG SHOW, a must read for the enthusiast .... bouncing the Me 262's on their finals was the only chance of knocking them down,as the German Jets were too fast to catch in combat, referred to as "Rat Catching",... the Tempest's from Volkel would scramble 4 aircraft on readiness with the pilots actually strapped in and waiting ... in 8 minutes from "scramble" they would be at 10,00ft above Rheine/Hopstein, shooting down 8 "rats" in one week using that technique,.. the German's answer was conserve fuel to allow for a flat-out run home at ground level until they made the safety of their "Flak corridor" , a 5 mile long "lane" that sported 160 quadruple 20mm mountings in a double line, with 3 Tempests lost in a week they were eventually forbidden to get within a 6 mile radius of the German airfield ... the mind boggles


    High Flight

    Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of earth
    And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
    Sunward I've climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
    Of sun-split clouds - and done a hundred things
    You have not dreamed of - wheeled and soared and swung
    High in the sunlit silence. Hov'ring there
    I've chased the shouting wind along, and flung
    My eager craft through footless halls of air.
    Up, up the long delirious, burning blue,
    I've topped the windswept heights with easy grace
    Where never lark, or even eagle flew -
    And, while with silent lifting mind I've trod
    The high untresspassed sanctity of space,
    Put out my hand and touched the face of God.


    Pilot Officer Gillespie Magee
    No 412 squadron, RCAF
    Killed 11 December 1941

  7. #7

    Default Re: A Tempest from a shed in southern France

    I think it was Jack who wrote book called 'Son of a tempest Pilot' or along those lines could be a good read

  8. #8
    ?

    Default Re: A Tempest from a shed in southern France

    Quote by kiwiwreckdiver View Post
    I think it was Jack who wrote book called 'Son of a tempest Pilot' or along those lines could be a good read
    "Jack" is a member here kwd? .. cheers









    Hawker Tempest


    Tempest V Series 1 JN766 of 486 Sqn. April 1944. Pilot may be Flt Lt. William Miller of Invercargill.
    Re-equipped with Hawker Tempests, initially in January - February 1944,[13] and later again in April. Although 486 Sqn was the first unit to receive Tempests, 3 Squadron was the first unit fully equipped. The unit was changed back to fighter defence after D-Day and claimed 223 V-1 flying bombs, the second highest number of any unit. At the end of April 1944 the 486 squadron became part of 150 Wing, along with 3 Squadron and 56 Squadron. (the latter still equipped with Spitfire VBs and, later, Hawker Typhoons), under the command of Wing Commander Roland Beamont.[14] Beamont wrote about 486 Sqn.

    "...an exuberant bunch of New Zealanders with a brilliant record on Typhoons and a rather casual approach (as I was soon to find out) to King's Regulations and Air Council instructions - and to "Pommy Bastard" wing leaders!" [15]

    No. 486 Squadron RNZAF - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  9. #9

    Default Re: A Tempest from a shed in southern France

    Always good to meet another Kiwi,
    Great video and great book.
    Hamish

  10. #10
    ?

    Default Re: A Tempest from a shed in southern France

    Sure Hamish,

    My brother in law has dived a few Pacific wreck's .... have to catch you up on one of your threads sometime, Im on the East Coast, Napier, and was a commercial fisherman most of my working life, the call of the sea huh?

    Allan

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