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Type 26 revolver

Article about: Just picked up a nice Type 26 revolver & Nambu holster, however, the end of the firing pin appears to have been machine "shaved" to prevent firing. My questions: Was this a com

  1. #1

    Default Type 26 revolver

    Just picked up a nice Type 26 revolver & Nambu holster, however, the end of the firing pin appears to have been machine "shaved" to prevent firing. My questions: Was this a common practice to allow the gun to be brought in after the war? I understand these are rare (under 60,000 made), so what are the chances of picking up a replacement? and would replacing it with a non-original hammer/pin affect the value? In other words, is it better to have it all original, but non-firing or the other way around? Any info on where one might acquire a replacement hammer/pin (it appears to be one piece) would be appreciated. Thanks.
    Last edited by BigBadWulf; 01-19-2014 at 03:51 AM.

  2. #2

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    Hey there Wulfie, i don't know where you are from but i know live weapons were taken back to the US. Welcome to the forum!...
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  3. #3
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    Good machine shop can make these very easy for you. Otherwise check Numrich gun parts.

  4. #4

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    My uncle took a model 1922 off a german police officer right after he was liberated by the Russians. {reserve lazarette 4d/z) When he finally got back to the USA they allowed him to keep the pistol with a demilled firing pin. He worked at the oliver tractor factory after the war and had a toolmaker friend make him a new pin. He never fired the pistol until a few years ago.... Sadly he is no longer with us but according to him it was a lot less of a hassle to get the pistol back by letting them break the firing pin...He was in a military hospital for 6 months after being liberated though??

  5. #5
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    Quote by BigBadWulf View Post
    Just picked up a nice Type 26 revolver & Nambu holster, however, the end of the firing pin appears to have been machine "shaved" to prevent firing. My questions: Was this a common practice to allow the gun to be brought in after the war? I understand these are rare (under 60,000 made), so what are the chances of picking up a replacement? and would replacing it with a non-original hammer/pin affect the value? In other words, is it better to have it all original, but non-firing or the other way around? Any info on where one might acquire a replacement hammer/pin (it appears to be one piece) would be appreciated. Thanks.

    Don't bugger about with parts. If it's all original, keep it that way.


    Under made 60,000 isn't /that/ rare, the question is how many of them have made it into your country that define how rare it is (since most people wouldn't go trough the hassle of importing firearms, even if given the option).

  6. #6

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    I appreciate the feedback and the advice. I suspected there might be a reason for the "clipped" pin. I am in no hurry to fire it, so it will stay all original for now and quite a while. The serial is in the 31xxx and the Nambu (holster only - no strap, no rod) is sweet. Thanks again for the quick response. My first post. I know a little more now what to do.

  7. #7

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    You may want to try Guns for Sale - Online Gun Auction - Buy Guns at GunBroker.com also, they end up with all sorts of guns, parts and pieces to include militaria. Good luck.

  8. #8

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    The unique 9mm rimmed round would be unobtainable anyway-no need to shoot it.

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