Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

German soldier self portrait

Article about: This painting was a self portrait by Fritz Boeke, German POW that was in a prison work camp near my grandparents home. My grandfather helped oversee the POW's while they were working, and be

  1. #11

    Default Re: German soldier self portrait

    You guys are a wealth of information. I'm forever grateful.
    This is one of those 'family keepsakes' that will be cherished forever....along with the book "To Hell And Back" signed by Audie Murphy.
    FWIW....my father was stationed in Manilla during this war.

    The swastiska definitely looks scratched out.

    The wound medal definitely looks gold. I know my photo is dark, but the left side of the helmet is yellow....though, I guess brown paint could have turned over the years. I remember my grandfather telling me that he made the colors from anything he could find and even mentioned using 'berries'. Obviously, prison camps aren't the ideal place to get supplies.

  2. # ADS
    Circuit advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    P
    Many
     

  3. #12

    Default Re: German soldier self portrait

    I just got off the phone with my father after sharing this newly acquired information.
    He said this soldier's home was in the Russian-occupied area, and he definitely was not looking forward to going home. He was trying to get my grandfather to "sponsor" him, in order for him to be able to come back to the states. Dad said he wasn't sure why that didn't work out....and figured it may have money issue....as my grandfather was struggling to raise two kids at the time.

    I have more correspondence (letters from him and others) that I'll try to find and scan for those interested. He sent several letters after the war, requesting food packages and such. As bad as we had it over here, their country and way of life were completely devastated.

    I wonder if there's anyway to track down his family? I've tried to do searches on his name, home town, etc....but I keep getting websites that are completely German. Although my last name is Föltz and come from German ancestors, no one in my family speaks a word of German.

  4. #13

    Default Re: German soldier self portrait

    Many Germans and Russian soldiers did not want to return home after the war. The matter of fact, hundreds of Russian POWs came to the United States after they were liberated from the Nazi camps. They did not want to return to their Motherland because of the Communist regime and other factors. The US government tried multiple times to force the Russian POWs back to Russia, but they would rather die then go back. Believe it or not, US officials actually drugged the Russian refugees, piled them into a boat while they were knocked out, and sent them back to Europe. You don't hear about that in history class. The point is, I don't blame him for not wanting to return home in a Russian Occupied zone, it must have been pretty bad right after the war.


    EDIT: I did more research on this, turns out those Russian POW's had actually fought against their own country and Stalin wanted revenge on them. That is why they did not want to return, they would surely face execution.

    Regards,

    Corey

  5. #14

    Default Re: German soldier self portrait

    Quote by Fanof49ASU View Post
    You guys are a wealth of information. I'm forever grateful.
    This is one of those 'family keepsakes' that will be cherished forever....along with the book "To Hell And Back" signed by Audie Murphy.
    FWIW....my father was stationed in Manilla during this war.

    The swastiska definitely looks scratched out.

    The wound medal definitely looks gold. I know my photo is dark, but the left side of the helmet is yellow....though, I guess brown paint could have turned over the years. I remember my grandfather telling me that he made the colors from anything he could find and even mentioned using 'berries'. Obviously, prison camps aren't the ideal place to get supplies.
    Many black wound badges were made from brass or tombak with a painted surface. If you go to is thread, you will be able to see many black badges that appear to be gold. I am not saying that it is not gold, just that there were many more black ones awarded than gold.
    http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/orders...schwartz-6327/
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  6. #15

    Default Re: German soldier self portrait

    This painting was made maybe a year or two, at most, after the wound badge was originally awarded to the soldier. There is no way in that short time frame that a black badge would have been worn off like that. Plus the soldier would not have painted a worn out black badge, but a complete black badge.

    Regards,

    Corey
    Last edited by Sir Payne; 06-07-2012 at 06:44 AM.

  7. #16

    Default Re: German soldier self portrait

    RB, you're right....it does look like that first one in the link. I guess the badge could 'wear' that much over a 2 or 3 year period.

    Are there a databases anywhere to find military records on German soldiers? Obviously, something we can access?

  8. #17

    Default Re: German soldier self portrait

    Quote by cgp1066 View Post
    This painting was made maybe a year or two, at most, after the wound badge was originally awarded to the soldier. There is no way in that short time frame that a black badge would have been worn off like that. Plus the soldier would not have painted a worn out black badge.

    Regards,

    Corey
    Sorry Corey but, how can you positively make any of those comments? There is no way that we can tell when the painting was done, nor can we know when the badge was awarded. If he was in a tank, it could wear the paint off of the badge very quickly from where it would rub against metal. I also see a piped tunic, which would indicate an early wrap. Also, why would he not paint the Ostfront through the button hole as it would have been worn? As I said, I am not saying that it is not a gold, only that there were many more blacks awarded than gold.
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  9. #18

    Default Re: German soldier self portrait

    Quote by cgp1066 View Post
    Plus the soldier would not have painted a worn out black badge.
    I didn't see your comment earlier (slow computer).....but that's a good point. I would imagine he would paint everything to like new condition.
    If the medal was black, I would think he would use more shades of gray and deep blacks...since they were obviously available. I'm no fine artist, but I am a graphic designer...and I can promise you, it's hard to replicate gold as a color using primary colors. It would always appear mustard at best.

    I'll try to get a better picture soon.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •