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WW II German Sturmgeschütz III Wooden Toy.

Article about: I've had this for probably thirty years. My grandfather gave it to my dad and my father gave it to me. My grandfather brought this back from Germany at the end of WWII. I never knew anything

  1. #31

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    Quote by bigmacglenn1966 View Post
    The manufacturers stamp reads: Fabrik fur feinpolierte Holzwaren-Technische Holzwaren fur die Industrie...Manufacturer of fine-polished wooden goods/ Technical goods for Industry....Not a toy, which would likely be labeled "Spielwaren" instead...
    cheers, Glenn
    I agree with Glenn and I still say that this is an instructional model, even if the manufacturers believe otherwise today. Firstly the stamp is not something you expect on a toy. Secondly its too fragile, any little boy would break it to pieces. Thirdly, by the time this must have been made, the German economy had more pressing matters than toys. Fourthly, its nearly identical to the models shown in 'The Panzer soldier' as mentioned in my first post. The text explains that many of these instructional models were made by toy companies. Lastly, the stamp is similar to those shown on these instructional models. The author says that these models were all made in 1/20th scale. If that's the scale of your model, then I think we have proof.

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  3. #32

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    It depends what you mean by the term - 'instructional.' There is little you could actually teach recruits with a small wooden model. All it shows is the outline of the Stug. So it either has to be a model meant as a desk ornament for office or home - or perhaps a model used to teach German gunners the art of vehicle recognition.
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

  4. #33

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    The key question for me is wether its a military or civilian item. In the case of the later, the book I mentioned says they were supplied for instruction to anti tank gunners, as you suggest.

  5. #34

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    Quote by HARRY THE MOLE View Post
    It depends what you mean by the term - 'instructional.' There is little you could actually teach recruits with a small wooden model. All it shows is the outline of the Stug. So it either has to be a model meant as a desk ornament for office or home - or perhaps a model used to teach German gunners the art of vehicle recognition.
    Personally I believe it might be either; intended to instruct soldiers in recognition / gunnery or a designers / manufacturers concept / demonstration model.

    Engineering companies all over the world have made exactly this type of model ever since what we in UK call the "Industrial Revolution" and have used them during concept and design conferences when dicussing amongst designers or briefing potential users. They still do it today even in the age of computer models as do architects.

    Also anyone who has served in the military during the last 100 years will have seen similar items used in recognition or gunnery training.

    Along with the explanation above concerning the nomenclature on the label the physical accurracy and construction of this piece make it very difficult for me so see any likelyhood of it ever being produced as a plaything.

    I think it is a nice example of a particular type of militaria,

    Regards

    Mark
    PS Sir Christopher Wren built an accurate wooden model of St Pauls Cathedral mounted on a table with a hole for a viewers head so that the interior could be seen as well.

  6. #35

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    That looks great, Ralph! Thank you! I wish that I could give you dimensions for the flaps but they are all missing and I don't ever recall seeing them. I know that my dad played with this when he was a kid so I'll just blame it on him.
    Thanks Ralph.

    Luke

  7. #36

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    Quote by rogge16 View Post
    That looks great, Ralph! Thank you! I wish that I could give you dimensions for the flaps but they are all missing and I don't ever recall seeing them. I know that my dad played with this when he was a kid so I'll just blame it on him.
    Thanks Ralph.

    Luke
    Thanks Luke,
    You should be able to get a width measurement from the fender and guess at the length by looking at the photos of the other one. The new shield and other parts are made from solid maple that has been cut and sanded to the appropriate dimensions. It has been treated with sanding sealer to acquire a smooth finish when painted. I don't believe matching the paint color will be as difficult as matching the cracking in the original paint. Here are a few more photos.
    Ralph.
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    The original model is not made from solid wood but rather a form of sawdust or chips combined with some sort of resin and formed under high pressure. Here are a few photos to show this.
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    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  8. #37

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    "The original model is not made from solid wood but rather a form of sawdust or chips combined with some sort of resin and formed under high pressure. Here are a few photos to show this."

    An early form of chipboard or MDF perhaps? It certainly seems more like an "architechural" model making technique for making illustrative "demonstration" pieces rather than toys. Such a production method would allow accurate dimensions to be created quickly and without particular carpentry skills once the tooling was produced. I suppose it might also be explained as another of the many "Ersatz" materials used in times of austerity. Still not a toy for my "six pennyworth"

    Regards

    Mark
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  9. #38

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    For what it's worth, I'll say that in my opinion, it's not a toy or an instructional piece, but rather a desk top model for an officer or some such person. I would not expect to see the very prominent display of the manufacturer company and their address, etc on it, otherwise. In any case, it's a cool little thing and very worthy of being in anyone's prized collection.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  10. #39

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    Thanks for all the comments guy. I really appreciate it!

    Luke

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