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First Trans Atlantic Crossing Souvenir

Article about: Here's something just a bit different I thought I'd share with you guys. This is a small propeller that drove a fuel pump on NC3 during the First Atlantic Crossing. It is documented by the f

  1. #1

    Default First Trans Atlantic Crossing Souvenir

    Here's something just a bit different I thought I'd share with you guys. This is a small propeller that drove a fuel pump on NC3 during the First Atlantic Crossing. It is documented by the flight engineer Richardson as a experimental propeller and was noted to work smoother and better than the single blade version. As you history buffs know, NC3 made it right up to the last leg of the journey where it was damaged by rough seas. NC4 was able to complete the last leg of the flight and became the first plane to cross the Atlantic. There is a "Path" video showing NC3 and at one point you can clearly see this little propeller mounted on it's perch on the hull. Now for the interesting part. Was this prop removed from NC3 and used on NC4 for the last leg of the journey since it worked better and provided better operation? The person at the Emil Buehler Library in Pensacola Florida cut me a little short when he was researching the information logs. He wanted a 100 bux to tell me the rest of the story and I never agreed to pay it since I thought that was a little cheesy. I didn't have anymore contact with him or them after that. Anyway, I guess I need to finish gathering the info and document it while it's still on my mind and Grandpa said he borrowed it from NC4. Here are some photos, the only ID marks is "SP 5" which is stamped on each blade which I'm not sure what it means. NC4 is on display in the Naval Air Museum in Pensacola Florida. It has the single bladed wooden propeller in place where this one went on NC3. If you guys have any info or a friend that wouldn't care to "divulge the rest of the story" it would be greatly appreciated.Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2

    Default

    That's a very interesting item.
    So was the propeller to drive the fuel pump or was it for cooling?
    gregM
    Live to ride -- Ride to live

    I was addicted to the "Hokey-Pokey" but I've turned
    myself around.

  3. #3

    Default

    Richardson's notes indicate it drove a fuel pump.

  4. #4

    Default

    So the fuel pump would not function unless the plane were moving?
    What got the fuel moving for take off?----just curious.
    gregM
    Live to ride -- Ride to live

    I was addicted to the "Hokey-Pokey" but I've turned
    myself around.

  5. #5

    Default

    Don't know on that one. It would be interesting to see the drawings on how these engines worked. I would also "guess" that maybe the gauges were vacuum driven and would too not work until things were in motion. Just guessing but I would say these old liberty engines had to have a healthy dose of priming to get'em going. That will give me something to research this evening LOL.

  6. #6

    Default

    Other than saying these were bellows driven I can not find out anything more. Here is a photo of where this windmill type prop replaced one of the single bladed ones. If you look forward of the sliding hatch you can clearly see these. Two on the left and two on the right. They are 4 total and I would assume that one went to each of the four engines.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #7

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    Love it! As one of my interests is the Royal Air Force Ferry Command, these early transatlantic pieces of history are right up my street! Thanks for showing it. Leon.
    "Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut." Ernest Hemingway

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