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Digging in KURLAND

Article about: And this is short documentary about how we dug out Grossdeutchland soldiers.

  1. #281

    Default Re: Digging in KURLAND

    You can take it to jeweler and have it tested for gold then you will know.Good luck

  2. #282

    Default Re: Digging in KURLAND

    I think it is the frame of a german motorcycle side car.
    I have seen these before some where?

  3. #283

    Default Re: Digging in KURLAND

    Quote by guns ltd View Post
    I think it is the frame of a german motorcycle side car.
    I have seen these before some where?
    Do You think about the frame from page 16?

    Regards,
    Andris

  4. #284

    Default Re: Digging in KURLAND

    Hi Andris, I see you got a bit of snow there! hope the ground thaws soon so you can resume your hobby! (and you got me again, posting another horse shoe on ebay! lol)

    Jay

  5. #285

    Default Re: Digging in KURLAND

    Awsome stuff indeed. Just keep up the good work! Two thumbs up!

  6. #286

    Default Re: Digging in KURLAND

    Hey evryone i guess im a bit young to be on this website but i am a collecter and i take interest in these forums. I think you have some AMAZING finds there and i am green with envy. I dont have a big collection (i only have two things =P). but i do have a mint condition german helmet (no markings on the outside) and a mothers cross (bronze) you can see in my picture. I allways wanted to metel-detect but there is a law in ireland about that!!!

  7. #287
    martiniman
    ?

    Default Re: Digging in KURLAND

    Film about diggers in Latvia:
    http://latvia.onlinefilm.org/en_EN/film/28168

  8. #288
    ?

    Default Re: Digging in KURLAND

    Quote by HistoryIsMe View Post
    Hey evryone i guess im a bit young to be on this website but i am a collecter and i take interest in these forums. I think you have some AMAZING finds there and i am green with envy. I dont have a big collection (i only have two things =P). but i do have a mint condition german helmet (no markings on the outside) and a mothers cross (bronze) you can see in my picture. I allways wanted to metel-detect but there is a law in ireland about that!!!
    and you wont find much ww2 stuff detecting in ireland unless you find one of the german crashed fighters around wicklow or dublin

  9. #289

    Default Re: Digging in KURLAND

    actully where i live in co.Kerry there was a crash in the mountans, and the three germans didint know what to do, so they went to a farm and they asked if they could sleep in the barn. The women told them they could, and the next morning she told the gards and the gards didint know what to do with them so they brought them to the station and they where allowed out when they wanted. and once the war ended 2 of the germans ended up marrying local girls!

    I dont know if its accurate but its what the locals say and if you go up to the mountan you can find pieces of an aircraft.

  10. #290

    Default Re: Digging in KURLAND

    Quote by HistoryIsMe View Post
    actully where i live in co.Kerry there was a crash in the mountans, and the three germans didint know what to do, so they went to a farm and they asked if they could sleep in the barn. The women told them they could, and the next morning she told the gards and the gards didint know what to do with them so they brought them to the station and they where allowed out when they wanted. and once the war ended 2 of the germans ended up marrying local girls!

    I dont know if its accurate but its what the locals say and if you go up to the mountan you can find pieces of an aircraft.
    Regarding this incident here is the minutae with thanks to the Warplane Research Group of Ireland.


    Luftwaffe Focke Wulf 200 ''Condor'' of KG40 departed Bordeaux in Western France on the morning of the 20th of August, 1940, to carry out weather reconnaissance and pressure readings off the north west coast of Ireland. As the huge 4 engine aircraft with a crew of 6 straddled the coastline of Mayo, Galway and Clare it developed engine problems and the pilot decided to try and return home. The problems intensified and therefore a decision was made to force land the aircraft at sea rather than attempt to land in the dense fog not knowing exactly where they were. Through the mist one of the crew could just make out Tralee Bay and in particular ''Hogs Head''. The pilot, Captain Kurt Mollenhauer, from Cuxhaven, set course due west as the aircraft began to descend in dense fog.




    Little did anyone on board realize they were heading for Mount Brandon. On the ground, young Seán O' Dowd was helping to cut reeds and was startled to hear the roar of a very big aircraft as it seemed to pass over his head in the dense fog. He thought at the time that it would not get over Brandon at such a low altitude and he was partially correct. Back on board, Mollenhauer was startled to observe mountain moor-land rushes coming up to greet him as his aircraft virtually belly landed on top of Faha Ridge, below Mount Brandon. Four of the crew suffered broken limbs while two were unscathed. With the ridge encased in thick fog, Mollenhauer decided that they should carry the more seriously injured in a life raft to a lower altitude.




    In the village of An Clochán (Cloghane), the alarm had been raised and scores of local people and a member of the Gárda Síochána were making their way towards the beginning of ‘The Pilgrims Path’. As the aircrew, en masse, approached O' Connors farm they were met by a Miss O' Connor who handed Mollenhauer a jug of milk and said ''Sláinte''. This gesture verified to the aircraft Captain that they had landed in neutral Eire (his words) and he felt very safe. The Gárda based in Cloghane notified his superiors in Tralee and they in turn notified the Army in Ballymullen Barracks. A detachment of the 15th Infantry Battalion was on hand at Cloghane to officially welcome the crew to Ireland. It was decided to take three of the crew to St. Catherine’s Hospital in Tralee while the remainder were taken to Collins Barracks, in Cork, where they were arrested and detained. Since the Curragh Internment Camp had not yet been built, there was consternation in Cork not knowing what to do with the three German prisoners. A rather unsure Army Officer was instructed to phone Army Headquarters in Parkgate in Dublin and explain his predicament to an unnamed voice who did not identify himself immediately. The young officer asked the pertinent question. Sir: Do we hold them or do we shoot them. He was instructed to detain them indefinitely by the unnamed voice, Prime Minster Eamonn De Valera.




    Back in Tralee, the nursing staff treated Mollenhauer and his two colleagues most cordially where they were detained for six weeks. Each night they were given a bottle of Guinness to help them sleep. During their forced detention in Tralee and Cork, the Curragh Internment Camp was being made ready and at the end of September, 1940, it opened for business. Captain Mollenhaur, Radio Operator Kyck and their four colleagues had the unenviable honour of becoming neutral Ireland’s first internees. However, all was not doom and gloom in County Kildare. It is a well-known fact that the internees were allowed sign out to attend horse racing at the Curragh, to attend public dances in Newbridge and to visit the German Embassy in Dublin and to attend Trinity College. Indeed while attending the German Embassy both Kurt Mollenhauer and Kurt Kyck met their future Irish wives. On the 20th of August, 1990, Victor Sullivan, Frank Donaldson, Gary Johnson, Sean O' Dowd and myself (Gerard O' Regan) were on hand to greet Kurt Kyck and Kurt Mollenhauer and their wives back to Cloghane and to O'Connor's farm near ‘The Pilgrims Path’ where they met Miss O'Connor again, 50 years exactly since she handed him the jug of milk. At the time of writing this, in 2004, Kurt Mollenhauer is deceased while Kurt Kyck resides in eastern Ireland.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

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