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Hurricane crash site.

Article about: The following items i have found lying on the surface of a nearby field, usually after ploughing. I undersatnd that it was the site of a hurricane crash in 1941. Any help with identifying th

  1. #1

    Default Hurricane crash site.

    The following items i have found lying on the surface of a nearby field, usually after ploughing. I undersatnd that it was the site of a hurricane crash in 1941. Any help with identifying these pieces would be of great help. The first picture shows some perspex and what i believe is the outer surface of the propeller.

    Steve.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture 025.jpg   023.jpg  

    024.jpg   026.jpg  

    027.jpg   028.jpg  

    030.jpg   031.jpg  


  2. #2

    Default re: Hurricane crash site.

    Some interesting pieces.......

    I do alot of research on crash sites and the pilots but cant identify anything but the obvious, perspex from the canopy and what looks like a dial from the instument panel.

    You could also have some links from the harness or parachute perhaps?

    Any thoughts if you will research the site?

  3. #3
    OKW
    ?

    Default re: Hurricane crash site.

    Looking at photo 2 with the buckles. I would say that the buckles must be closely related to the human element of the machine, i can't think of any components on the airframe which would have been strapped on. Whether the buckles are part of the seat or parachute harness is debatable. Which ever then the buckle on the left lower must have been subjected to some force to bend it in the manner it is bent, almost as though the strap has been pulled through and out. As i think that the buckles are some form of restraint strap, restraining the pilot, and the only forces that would have been exerted on the buckles would be by the pilot i would surmise that the pilot was still in the aircraft when it came to earth, Had he bailed out then there would have been nothing to strain the buckle in the way it has been. Plough damage would have been more random in my opinion. Which leads on to the question is he or parts thereof still there?

  4. #4

    Default re: Hurricane crash site.

    There could be a possibility that human remains will be on site but will depend on the nature of the crash, did it go straight into the ground or did the pilot manage to belly land. I don't want to get too gruesome on this.

    Abit of research for possible aircraft identity could throw up the aircraft history and possible accident report.

  5. #5

    Default re: Hurricane crash site.

    I'm interested in how the .303 bullet and shell cases got there

  6. #6

    Default re: Hurricane crash site.

    Quote by GasMasksUK View Post
    I'm interested in how the .303 bullet and shell cases got there
    The early Hurricanes were armed with eight .303 Browning MG's.

    Cheers, Ade.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Hurricane crash site.

    The bottom pic is most definately a climb and descent indicator. They are really no different on todays light aircraft.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Hurricane crash site.

    The condition of these small pieces of wreckage show that it did not belly land, but went straight in....and hard.
    That snapped buckle is from a parachute harness,so the worst can be considered as to the pilots fate. In 95% of these cases where the location was known, the RAF maintainance units would go to great lengths to clear the wreckage and recover any bodies or, as would often be the case, fragmentary remains as possible.
    Herein lies the rub. In some areas in this country, it was deemed only neccessary to recover only 8lbs of human remains for burial, as this was the average weight in which we all came into the world.
    Therefore it is entirely possible that some of the pilots remains are still in the crash site whether substantial or fragmentary. The site is protected by government LAW and should not be excavated without the written permission of the M.O.D after the full facts of the accident / action are known.
    This law came into being after several sites were disturbed and human remains left scattered around the dig site.
    Failure to comply with this law can result in a substantial prison sentence, so please be careful. A little field walking may be o.k, but don't fall into the trap other over enthusiastic 'wreckologists' have!

    Happy Hunting, Ned.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Hurricane crash site.

    Nice items , the gauge is correctly identified as a RATE of CLIMB
    ,its part number is 6A/723 and was fitted to the standard
    British Blind flying Panel,you may have bits of panel looking at
    photo 6,I have attached a rather ratty photo of any early blind
    flying panel,with the r of c top right.
    I think Big Ned offers very sound advice regarding possible
    problems,plus it is well documented that initial recovery of .303
    and other ammunition,from underground,on being reunited
    with atmosphere,some of being incendiary ,will suddenly
    start cooking off,not a good look!!
    Have you any more bits to show?
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture 090.JPG  

  10. #10

    Default Re: Hurricane crash site.

    I have done some resaerch into the site. Firstly the actual site was dug in the 1980's with the majority of the plane being removed by a local group of enthusiasts. (Apparently it was carried out in a rush). I do not know which group carried out the excavation but speaking to locals they made a hell of a mess and a huge hole with a hired JCB. I have heard different stories about the pilot. I know he was killed in the accident and is buried in a nearby cemetry some one told me that remains were found in the dig but others have not heard anything of the sort. Apparently though when the excavation took place the parachute was removed and opened, a gust of wind caught it and dragged it across the field and into some nearby trees.

    The incident itself occured in August 1941 when two hurricans of 52 OTU were practicing dog fighting in the area. Unfortuantly there was a collision and both planes crashed to the ground killing both NZ pilots. As far as i understand the other plane lies in a field about 2 miles away untouched.

    Regarding the pieces above i am particulary interested in the catch looking piece on the second photo next to the buckles. The round item in the third photo is a filler cap of some kind, but where from?. Also the piece in the bottom right hand corner of the 4th photo is made from brass, any ideas.

    Over the past few years i have found hundreds more pieces, most though scrap. i will though dig out the pieces of engine i have found and put them on here.

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