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Unkown huge bomb. NEED IDENTIFICATION!

Article about: If you cannot see that the inside of this shell is empty, you have to assume it is live. The side pocket fuzes are very worrying as one is likely to be an anti-tamper fuze, and the other cou

  1. #1

    Default Unkown huge bomb. NEED IDENTIFICATION!

    Hello guys. A friend of mine was given this huge bomb. What could be? At the bottom has two holes, as shown in the photos below.No marks or anything else useful. Opinions and photos related please!
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture DSC_0976.jpg   DSC_0977.jpg  

    DSC_0978.jpg   DSC_0979.jpg  

    DSC_0980.jpg   DSC_0981.jpg  

    DSC_0982.jpg  

  2. #2

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    No expert but that thing might still be live, get it checked out!.....
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  3. #3

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    Looks like a naval shell of some kind. I would normally say be careful with anything related to ordnance, but in this case I think I will upgrade that advice to 'f***ing careful'. If that thing is still live it could destroy everything nearby. It looks like somebody messed around with the fuse long ago. Where did you find it? If in doubt,call the police / army.

  4. #4

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    Ok guys. Don't worry about the "living monster" over here. It's safe and disarmed. It has been found at the Greek island of Leros, where some very big naval cannons used to operate (known as "Navarone Guns). The two holes at the bottom might be a hint of a plane bomb??

  5. #5

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    thats what the raf thought when they mistakenly displayed A live Grand Slam bomb as a gate guardian at RAF Scampton for nearly fifteen years before the mistake was realised. It was gingerly removed (by crane and low-loader) to the test range at Shoeburyness, where it was detonated

  6. #6

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    It's not an aerial bomb, as it has no tail or fins, etc. It's almost certainly as said, a large Naval Artillery shell. If it is from one of the famed "Guns of Navarone", it would be a hugely desirable and sought after collectable piece! I'd say send it to me, but the shipping costs would be enough to induce a fair sized heart attack, I would imagine!
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  7. #7

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    Quote by Wagriff View Post
    It's not an aerial bomb, as it has no tail or fins, etc. It's almost certainly as said, a large Naval Artillery shell. If it is from one of the famed "Guns of Navarone", it would be a hugely desirable and sought after collectable piece! I'd say send it to me, but the shipping costs would be enough to induce a fair sized heart attack, I would imagine!
    Cannot be shipped Wagriff! If it does so, it would be an aerial bomb for sure!! Hehe.. I thought the same, that it's a heavy naval artillery bomb, but the guy who own it insist that it's an aerial one. I hope someone from warrelics forum will give me the answer i want so bad! What the heck is this bomb!

  8. #8

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    if you can get the diameter of the base and height that would be a start t0 determining what it flies out of. I hope you are very sure it is safe mate.

  9. #9
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    The "fuse pockets" appear to be welded in place, so cannot see it being a projectile, as it would not be strong enough to withstand the forces in the barrel of a long range naval gun - possibly some sort of heavy mortar bomb? or possibly aerial bomb? on the latter the fins were usually pretty lightweight and of separate construction fitted to the bomb, so looking at the condition, they could have easily corroded to the point of becoming detached or lost.

    Won't repeat the warnings as I cannot make an assessment from these photos, so will trust you know what you are doing.

  10. #10

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    Its not a Bomb, the shape is all wrong, if you put a tale on it would need to be at least as twice as long as it is for stability and that goes against bomb design of the time. They made MC bombs large at the front and narrow at the rear, the front was mainly steel and the rear explosive to a 60/40 ratio. I'm thinking this is a armour piercing coastal artillery round found in the sea looking at the corrosion, I was also thinking it may have been a base ejecting illumination round, is it hollow with a large visible hole in the bottom?

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