Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

WW1 .303 Inspection Rounds - the "motherload"

Article about: A few more bits coming out the WW1 section of my site. More drill rounds, in stripper clips and loose, plus what I am assuming is part of a pocket watch - am I wrong? cheers Matt

  1. #1

    Default WW1 .303 Inspection Rounds - the "motherload"

    I have been searching a site that I knew to be part of a WW2 camp used by the Canadians, and have recently been finding items dating back to WW1, most notably a 1914 pattern Maple Leaf cap badge, used I believe by the Canadian Expenditionary Force.

    While pocking around with my trusty Garrett pro-pointer on a bank and ditch arrangement that I believe is the boundary of the WW1 site, I came across a .303 round, then another, and another and another...... All were within a few inches of the top of the bank and had obviously been dumped as a pile and lightly covered over. So far I have recovered over 300 of what I now know to be .303 Inspection rounds - no blast cap, and no cordite and totally inert. Some have the remains of the coating (chrome) to allow the armourers to source the causes of feed problems. I have put a photo of a handful of the head to show the lack of blast cap - sorry for the crappy photo

    Most of the headstamps are in a fairly poor state but have managed to clean up a few and have one dated 1912.

    Here are the pictures of the first 240 or so that I found, along with a few stripper clips with the remains of training rounds (drilled)

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_5252.jpg 
Views:	13 
Size:	203.6 KB 
ID:	369476Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_5253.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	185.4 KB 
ID:	369475Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_5254.jpg 
Views:	6 
Size:	95.8 KB 
ID:	369474

  2. #2

    Default Re: WW1 .303 Inspection Rounds - the "motherload"

    Good lord ! What a find !!!

    If you use one of those tough metal scourers followed by a Brillo pad, you should be able to clean the heads up enough to read the stamp

    These are the ones I mean....

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	4-tough-scourers.jpg 
Views:	1 
Size:	74.8 KB 
ID:	369552

    I cup my hand with the scourer in it, get it full of hot soapy water then 'twist' the base of the cartridge in amongst the steel ribbons whilst pushing down hard. Usually gets the heads back to shiney



    Fantastic find.......all you need now is to clean them up, buy a 250 rnd Vickers belt, load it up with your finds, and you got yourself one hell of an awesome display piece

    Steve T

  3. #3
    ?

    Default Re: WW1 .303 Inspection Rounds - the "motherload"

    Harry - I have answered your question about the headstamp over on the cartridge forum before I saw these pictures.

    The rounds are definitely the Canadian local pattern of the Inspectors' Mak IV.

    See here: http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/ordina...stamps-196925/

    One small point - these rounds were chromed to clearly identify them as dummy rounds to avoid any nasty mistakes with live rounds. It was not for finding feed problems. Most Inspectors rounds ended up too scratched anyway!.

    Regards
    tonyE
    British Military Smallarms and Ammunition
    Collector, Researcher and Pedant
    https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/

  4. #4

    Default Re: WW1 .303 Inspection Rounds - the "motherload"

    Steve - Vickers belt sounds like a great idea. Almost got enough for 2 now Thanks for the tip on cleaning them up - I'm sure the wife has some of those floating around somewhere but have no idea where the cleaning stuff is kept

  5. #5

    Default Re: WW1 .303 Inspection Rounds - the "motherload"

    There's one here for 28

    Military Might Stock Page - Equipment

  6. #6
    ?

    Default Re: WW1 .303 Inspection Rounds - the "motherload"

    Unfortunately that is a Mark IV Stripless belt of WW2 era.

    To be true to your rounds you would need an earlier belt with brass strips, and that would be more expensive I am afraid!

    Regards
    TonyE
    British Military Smallarms and Ammunition
    Collector, Researcher and Pedant
    https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/

  7. #7

    Default Re: WW1 .303 Inspection Rounds - the "motherload"

    Indeed. I couldn't find a brass strip belt at short notice and they are normally upwards of 70 so I thought this one would do for now But I agree, it would need to be the brass stripped belt to be totally authentic to rounds of that vintage


    **EDIT***

    Here ya go

    303 250-round Vickers web Ammunition belt

  8. #8

    Default Re: WW1 .303 Inspection Rounds - the "motherload"

    Think I have finally cleared all the rounds from the area, though may take the main detector down for a final once over (been using the pro-pointer only so far). The scores on the doors are 321 inspection rounds, 14 drill rounds in the remains of stripper clips, a small tin (dubbin perhaps?), bit of a razor handle, a button, couple of other small bits of "stuff" and a mystery rectangular piece or metal (brass I think) - anyone any ideas what it might be? I am assuming it is contemporary with the WW1 era cartridges.

    Cleaned up a few of the headstamps, most illegible, others have 1913 & 1915 dates.

    cheers
    MattClick image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_8640.jpg 
Views:	6 
Size:	137.8 KB 
ID:	369974Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_8641.jpg 
Views:	3 
Size:	118.9 KB 
ID:	369975Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_8642.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	164.2 KB 
ID:	369976Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_8645.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	122.1 KB 
ID:	369977

  9. #9

    Default Re: WW1 .303 Inspection Rounds - the "motherload"

    Some good headstamps there And your mystery item isn't any more.........its the inside bit out of a harmonica, where the reeds would sit.

  10. #10

    Default Re: WW1 .303 Inspection Rounds - the "motherload"

    Quote by Steve T View Post
    Some good headstamps there And your mystery item isn't any more.........its the inside bit out of a harmonica, where the reeds would sit.
    Thanks steve..ahhh a harmonica, of course, why didn't I think of that

    well impressed with the id , never would have even crossed my mind

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •