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Cut Down 1907 Bayonet

Article about: Hi all. I have been asked to find something out about this bayonet. Clearly it is a cut down 1907 pattern in semi- relic condition. I thought at first that this was a ww1 trench knife conver

  1. #1

    Default Cut Down 1907 Bayonet

    Hi all. I have been asked to find something out about this bayonet. Clearly it is a cut down 1907 pattern in semi- relic condition. I thought at first that this was a ww1 trench knife conversion, however on closer inspection I can see on the ricasso that it is dated August 1919. I have not seen such a conversion carried out in WW2, could this be for another purpose? Any thoughts would be much appreciated. Cheers.
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  2. #2

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    Greetings Spitace41,

    Anything is possible, using these P1907 blades as a pry bar may easily snap them (especially, in the area where the new tip is located). Re-grinding/finishing the broken area into something of use tool-wise; say on a farm is obviously not out of the question. I had an old USN MkII that was beat to hell, left outside in the weather, and all it was ever used for was to cut the thin string that binds hay-bails. It was not cared for as it was ground down and already had one foot in the grave. That may explain the ground dug patina-ed /condition of your pictured blade (i.e. left stuck in a fence post for occasional use etc.). Not trying to imply the modification was not done by a soldier, just sharing a passing thought in terms of other possibilities.

    Regards,

    Lance

  3. #3

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    (early war)an American in the British army, habituated to

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    it could be shortened, for best shooting (stability, weight, ...)?

  4. #4

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    a bloke with short legs ?----------------------lol.

  5. #5
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    Some of conversion were done by Germans in WW2, the blade lenght should be 250mm probably.

  6. #6

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    Plenty of blades made into fighting knives/utility pieces and no shortage of damaged blades on active service.

  7. #7

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    news
    the Turks and the Indians cut down the 1907, also the Australians made a short 1907 based bayonet for the Owen and used broken blades to make up a limited number of Owen bayonets.
    The length the Indians are 12" the Turks are 10".

  8. #8

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    All useful information guys, thanks. The blade measures 8".

  9. #9
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    That means a 20,3cm a little short for german upgrade, most probably a combat rework or later upgrade as a knife.

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