Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27

L1A2 for the SLR L1A1 Aussie in NAM ?

Article about: Hi mates ! Was the Autralian L1A2 bayonet carried in VIETNAM ? overall lenght: 290 mm blade lenght: 190 mm Thx. in advance, R.

  1. #11

    Default

    Quote by Alex W View Post

    I think the 60,000 Australian personnel deployed might argue that point, not forgetting the 500 who paid the ultimate sacrifice.



    Alex
    Agreed, when I was a teenager I had 2 brothers as friends who lived across the road. Their dad was machine gunner in Vietnam, he'd never talk about it but apparantly one night he got drunk (as was often the case, his war experiences led him down a path of excessive drinking, and later, divorce) and broke down in tears, telling his boys they must never, ever join the army and go to war. His experiences (including exploring VC tunnels looking for lost comrades and sadly sometimes finding them in various states of dismemberment/torture) haunted him since those days. I would think his 'not being a big factor' might rankle somewhat.

  2. #12

    Default

    Quote by Gunny Hartmann View Post
    It is an Aussie bayonet though, as i think you guys were the only ones to make it with rounded ends to the fullers!...
    So it is !

    Also characteristically, the Australian L1A2 shows a protruding press catch.

    In comparison with the sheath of the british L1A3 the sheath of the Aussie L1A2 is also a little different, (more "slender" towards the "point"), actually.

  3. #13

    Default

    Quote by SRB View Post
    Australia was not a big factor in Vietnam
    You are wrong.

  4. #14

  5. #15

    Default

    Somewhat hijacking of the thread, but while it was a red hot political debate in Australia during the period, the actual numbers of troops over time were small in comparison to the US and ARVN, even on a population proportional basis-South Korea had several times as many men deployed there, a fact largely forgotten these days. Australia has only had substantial armed forces during the 2 World Wars-sending anything more than a brigade overseas has been/is beyond our capacities.
    As to the SLR and bayonet, they were issued it but dragging it along through the scrub fixed was not a good idea on what was already a long and heavy weapon in close country-I doubt they ever left the scabbard except as can openers!

    Edit PS-the P56 web frog for field use and modified blackened P37 frog for parade use along with the long and short point bayos.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	008.jpg 
Views:	254 
Size:	256.3 KB 
ID:	871874  

  6. #16

    Default

    Quote by lithgow View Post
    ...
    As to the SLR and bayonet, they were issued it but dragging it along through the scrub fixed was not a good idea on what was already a long and heavy weapon in close country-I doubt they ever left the scabbard except as can openers!

  7. #17

    Default

    Quote by SRB View Post
    Australia was not a big factor in Vietnam
    I'm sure you did not mean that the way it comes across!

    However, it is a pretty offensive thing to say without explainig what you mean. I am not Australian but I am a former British soldier and I reckon my digger colleagues (I served with quite a few on exchange visits to us) would see it that way. Also it has no bearing on the subject of this thread.

    Anyway, as for the question. I can think of no reason why the bayonet which is part of the CES (complete equipment schedule) of the rifle, would not be carried in the field. In the case of British '58 pattern webbing there was a frog built into the side of the left hand magazine pouch which tended to make the bayonet hard to see. I think the explanation might be similar in the Australian case. Aside from parades or certain guard duties the bayonet is very unlikely to be seen mounted on the rifle except in an action where it is about to be used to assault the enemy.

    As has been said above there is clear visual difference between the British and Australian versions, particularly the shape of the fuller end. I also have never seen an Australian bayonet with any markings at all whereas the British one bore the partial NATO Stock Number and a partial nomenclature L1A3 and a letter and number for the year of manufacture eg D70 on the grip. Some had a broad arrow on the pommel some did not. The tip of the blade is a different profile I think if you compare them side by side the British one being lorger and more "bowie" like. All the Australian ones I have seen have been fully oxidised, a dark grey with a slight green tinge to it. The British ones were generally painted an eggshell black on the grip and scabbard with the blade being parkerised (from memory going back some thirty odd years). The one shown is definately Australian and in mint condition by the look of it.

    Regards

    Mark

    As
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  8. #18
    ?

    Default

    I stand corrected on my comment that Aussie bayo' never carried markings......a superb example posted by the OP

  9. #19

    Default

    Quote by SRB View Post
    Australia was not a big factor in Vietnam
    Our National Museum in Canberra has a great division exhibit to our involvement , These shots are only a part of it We are really only a small country

  10. #20

    Default

    Quote by SRB View Post
    Australia was not a big factor in Vietnam
    A good example of a completely unnecessary comment

    A great bayo! Thanks for sharing!!
    Best regards,
    Chris

    "Knowledge rests not upon truth alone, but upon error also."
    Carl Jung

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Australian L1A2 Bayonets-Short & Long

    In Bayonets and trench knives of the world
    08-02-2016, 05:39 PM
  2. FN L1A1 rifle

    In World Firearms
    04-04-2013, 08:47 PM
  3. L1a1

    In World Firearms
    11-15-2012, 05:20 PM
  4. L1a1

    In World Firearms
    11-08-2012, 04:52 PM
  5. 01-02-2012, 07:39 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •