Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32

Zulu weapons

Article about: I wasn't really sure where to put this post. But as one of the items is bladed, and they are all weapons for fighting at close quarters, I thought they might fit in here. The spear is a bit

  1. #1

    Default Zulu weapons

    I wasn't really sure where to put this post. But as one of the items is bladed, and they are all weapons for fighting at close quarters, I thought they might fit in here.

    The spear is a bit of an oddity. The blade matches the type you would find on an 'iklwa.' But the shaft is more to the length of a throwing spear. The iklwa is a short length spear which was used as a thrusting weapon by the Zulu's to such deadly effect in the wars of 1879.

    The length of the blade is 12 inches, and width is 2 inches. Total length of the weapon is 53inches. The balance of the weapon is absolutely perfect. The war club (knobkerry) is just over 28 inches, and the carved head is almost 3 inches wide.

    The shield is of a type which was used for every day protection and also when engaging in stick-fighting. At 24 inches in length it is much smaller than the war shield. All three items show considerable age. And I don't think any are tourist junk. If anyone could shed further light on the spear I would be very grateful.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCF4486.jpg 
Views:	1198 
Size:	327.4 KB 
ID:	470956Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCF4488.jpg 
Views:	3408 
Size:	339.4 KB 
ID:	470957Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCF4489.jpg 
Views:	1628 
Size:	334.5 KB 
ID:	470958Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCF4490.jpg 
Views:	1243 
Size:	334.5 KB 
ID:	470959Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCF4487.jpg 
Views:	5711 
Size:	334.3 KB 
ID:	470963
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Zulu weapons

    Great items Steve!....
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  3. #3

    Default Re: Zulu weapons

    Hi Gunny,

    Anther two spears should arrive tomorrow. Both are supposed to be 19th century Zulu.

    Have a look at my signature. My daughter got the website up and running for the book last Sunday. Publication has been put back to about April. The MoD are being a bit 'difficult' about some of the contents.
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Zulu weapons

    I'm looking foreward to reading it mate!...
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  5. #5

    Default Re: Zulu weapons

    Look good, though I thought colonial period African spears used a short socket which fitted to a long metal sleeve on the wooden shaft? Or maybe that is a different tribe or an earlier period perhaps. The shield is very good condition for its age.
    Regards,

    Jerry

    Whatever its just an opinion.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Zulu weapons

    Nice Zulu gear but damn, now I cant get "Men of Harlech" out of my head!!!!!!!
    " When you're chewing on life's gristle, don't grumble, give a whistle "

  7. #7

    Default Re: Zulu weapons

    Regards,

    Jerry

    Whatever its just an opinion.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Zulu weapons

    Here is my African Colonial period spearhead, though no idea on the exact date or region/tribe it is from.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	African spearhead 1.jpg 
Views:	5088 
Size:	254.1 KB 
ID:	471018   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	African spearhead 2m.jpg 
Views:	2416 
Size:	276.2 KB 
ID:	471019  

    Regards,

    Jerry

    Whatever its just an opinion.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Zulu weapons

    Hi Steve,

    These items are notoriously difficult to pin down to a time frame and often even tribe. The shield is in my opinion likely a tourist piece, especially if it is only 24" long as that is still too small for a umbumaluza (small fighting shield). It's markings are interesting in that it represents the elite iNdlu-yengwe Ibutho (married men's regiment) who performed the initial charge at Rorke's Drift veering to the right to form the right 'horn' of the famous 'Buffalo' formation.

    The spear is hard to pin down as well, it could be Nigerian or Congolese, besides being Zulu, although I would guess personally that it is from the Southern African region because it appears to have copper wire bound around the shaft just behind the haft. Southern tribes were known for tearing down the new telegraph lines and using the wire for this kind of thing, it's almost a trademark of a genuine spear from that area. It has to be realised as well that these spears were made and used daily for hunting etc. until the 1950's and it's very hard if not impossible to date them, although the head could be very old and handed down through families whilst the shaft has been renewed many times, as is to be expected.

    You may already know, but the Zulu name for the spear 'iklwa' (besides asagi and maasai which are used by other S.A. tribes as well) comes from the sound the spear makes as it is withdrawn from a body!

    I can't comment on the knobkerrie other than it looks good, but I don't know much about them.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Zulu weapons

    Quote by Jerry B View Post
    Here is my African Colonial period spearhead, though no idea on the exact date or region/tribe it is from.
    Hi Jerry,

    I'm pretty sure the spear you've got is a Ngbandi tribal spear from the North Western region of the Congo (or is it Zaire, or has it gone back to Congo?) again, hard to pin down a date.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Czech Weapons in WW2

    In World Firearms
    09-22-2011, 01:27 PM
  2. Libyan weapons

    In World Firearms
    04-27-2011, 08:41 PM
  3. UK Law regarding relic weapons

    In World Firearms
    02-16-2009, 08:55 PM
  4. replica weapons

    In Living History
    09-14-2008, 08:40 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •