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variations of the Bundeswehr camo

Article about: some people here might be interested in this One of the last camouflage patterns implemented by the German Army during WW2 was Leibermuster. Although never fully implemented by the Nazis, th

  1. #1

    Default variations of the Bundeswehr camo

    some people here might be interested in this
    Name:  1st  Leibermuster.jpg
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    One of the last camouflage patterns implemented by the German Army during WW2 was Leibermuster. Although never fully implemented by the Nazis, the pattern apparently retained an enthusiastic following within the German Army after the war, and was in fact produced in limited quantities by a Belgian military firm for the newly formed Bundeswehr in the 1955-56 time frame. As with the wartime uniforms, the BW version was never fully implemented.
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    At approximately the same time, another WW2 era pattern - Splitternmuster (splinter pattern) - was given new life as a general purpose uniform for the Bundeswehr. Although retaining many of the original characteristics of the Wehrmacht pattern, the 1956 version can be distinguished from the wartime era design by prominent white patches, indicating an intentional slippage of the print screens during production. The full pattern consists of grass green and brown splintered shapes on a blue-grey or green-grey background, with an overlapping pattern of thin grey-green colored rain straits. Produced between 1956 and 1960, the pattern was never fully-implemented into the Bundeswehr, being primarily employed by infantry and airborne units (as two distinctive styles of uniform), and were largely withdrawn from service by the end of 1960. Only privately produced helmet covers in Splittertarn might be encountered for the next ten or fifteen years. There were, in fact, at least two distinctive color variations of the BW Splittertarn camouflage, having either a pale blue or a pale green background color. It is unknown whether these variations were intentional or simply a product of mistaken dye lots or different manufacturers.
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    A variant of the Splittermuster pattern dating to the same period employs much larger and more prominent rain flecks. This pattern, Bundeswehr Splittermuster - starke, incorporates grass green and brown splintered shapes on a grey-green background, with an overlapping pattern of thick black rain straits. Also utilized by both infantry and paratrooper units, evidence suggests that far fewer uniforms were produced in this pattern, it being much less commonly encountered. In English, the pattern might be called "broad splinter pattern." As with the standard Splittertarn, both infantry and airborne unfiorms were produced in this camouflage
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    Introduced to the Bundeswehr in the mid-1960s, Schneetarn (snow camouflage) is a general purpose coverall pattern designed for wear by soldiers operating in snow-covered terrain. The design consists of needle-like patches of dark green blurred edges on a snow white base. The design produced in the 1960s employs lighter colored green in less density than that of the 1980s. Both versions are illustrated below. Standard items of issue are a hooded poncho (reversible to solid white pattern), as well as smock and overtrousers. Despite its age, the German Army retains this pattern for use by its troops.
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    Following a trend set by NATO allies Great Britain and France, in 1993 Germany began trials of a desert camouflage pattern based on the schematics of its standard issue Flecktarn. Initially nicknamed Tropentarn ("tropical camouflage," although the term was entirely unofficial), early versions of the design consisted of sparse dark olive & reddish-brown spots on a sandy background. This desert pattern would remain in the trial stages until 1998-1999, when the first official version of the desert camouflage uniform was introduced. Known officially as drei Farben Tarndruck der Bundeswehr (three color camouflage of the Bundeswehr), the pattern is also known among some collectors as Wüstentarn (desert camouflage), or Desert Flecktarn pattern. Although rumors have existed for years that two versions of the desert pattern existed, German sources indicate this is technically untrue. Early trial versions (1993-1998) may have had slightly different colorations, but the official version (issued in 1999) remains standardized, although the effects of washing with certain other types of clothing have a history of altering the appearance of the pattern. The three-color (desert) camouflage is the standard arid/desert pattern of the German Armed Forces, and is intended for wear in dry climates with some modest foliage cover.
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    Introduced in 2004 and officially known as Wüstentarndruck der Bundeswehr (desert camouflage of the Bundeswehr), the pattern seen below is primarily issued to German special operations units (although it is available commercially and has been worn in Afghanistan). Consisting of clusters of pinkish-grey and brown spots on a light tan background, the design is intended to perform in very dry regions with virtually no vegetation or plant coverage.
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    At some point in the late 1950s, Germany again revived a wartime pattern for the BGS, the old Wehrmacht Sumpftarnmuster (marsh camouflage pattern). As with its Splittertarn predecessor, the BGS Sumpfmuster pattern can be distinguished from the WW2 era version, although it is much more difficult, particularly with the early versions, and fake WW2 era items are known to have been produced using postwar fabric. There were, in fact, three consecutive versions of the Sumpftarn camouflage pattern produced for the BGS, each one associated with a particular group of uniform items. The 1st BGS Sumpftarn pattern consists of non-overlapping russet & olive green shapes (having blurred edges) on a khaki background with an overlapping pattern of olive green rain straits. A BGS style field jacket, smock, trousers, M43 style cap & shelter quarter were produced using this 1st pattern camouflage from the late 1950s until circa 1960.
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    i don't have any info on the amoben camo so any help just write below
    any camo i missed also add

    thanks
    tom

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  3. #2

    Default Re: variations of the Bundeswehr camo

    what an idiot i am i missed out the most common of all
    flecktarn
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	258440The pattern with the most favorable results from the original Truppenversuch 76 trials was Flecktarnmuster B. Although not immediately adopted by the German Army, a subsequent Bundeswehr Truppenversuch in 1989 confirmed the effectiveness of the pattern and subsequently it was introduced as a standard combat pattern for the Bundeswehr in that year (in fact, implementation had begun a few years earlier). Officially known as Funf Farben Tarndruck der Bundeswehr (Five color camouflage of the Bundeswehr), Flecktarn remains the standard issue combat uniform pattern of the German Armed Forces, with a wide variety of uniform items and field equipment being produced in this camouflage scheme. An increased German presence in peacekeeping efforts around the world during the mid-1990s sparked an interest in developing a modified uniform for wear in tropical, hot weather climates. This resulted in the adoption of a another version of the Funf Farben Tarndruck der Bundeswehr (five color camouflage of the Bundeswehr) which has also been nicknamed Tropentarn. Printed on lighter weight fabric for issue on deployments in hot weather climates, the tropical or hot weather uniform uniform was adopted in 2001. The pattern itself represents only a slight modification in the coloration of the standard Flecktarnmuster.


    tom

  4. #3
    ?

    Default Re: variations of the Bundeswehr camo

    Good post Tom I missed it the first time around the amoben camouflage is very intriguing First time I have ever heard of it or seen a photo would love to add some to my camo collection.

    Regards Mark K
    Always on the look out for WW II Canadian Helmets and Cam nets to add to my collection.

    Found a Canadian Mk II Medics Helmet and yes I know they are about as rare as hens teeth !!!!!

  5. #4

    Default Re: variations of the Bundeswehr camo

    Quote by kozowy1967 View Post
    Good post Tom I missed it the first time around the amoben camouflage is very intriguing First time I have ever heard of it or seen a photo would love to add some to my camo collection.

    Regards Mark K
    same here ive only ever seen the zeltbahn cover and the m43 in amoben and im glad you liked the thread

  6. #5
    ?

    Default Re: variations of the Bundeswehr camo

    I will plug away at the keys and see if I can find a bit more about it you should repost the image of the M43 style cap to the modern camo possibly Dave or Rene may have some details It would not surprise me if Rene pulled a complete set from his HOARD of equipment I think that man lives in a surplus store

    Regards Mark K
    Always on the look out for WW II Canadian Helmets and Cam nets to add to my collection.

    Found a Canadian Mk II Medics Helmet and yes I know they are about as rare as hens teeth !!!!!

  7. #6

    Default Re: variations of the Bundeswehr camo

    Quote by kozowy1967 View Post
    I will plug away at the keys and see if I can find a bit more about it you should repost the image of the M43 style cap to the modern camo possibly Dave or Rene may have some details It would not surprise me if Rene pulled a complete set from his HOARD of equipment I think that man lives in a surplus store

    Regards Mark K
    lol yeah i shall do that in a bit

  8. #7
    ?

    Default Re: variations of the Bundeswehr camo

    Hey Tom a little more info on the amoeba camo pattern : The BW Zelt-tarnmuster is a unique design one one side is (Sommer/summer) it consists of black,dark olive and tan amoebic shapes over a splintered background pattern of light and medium olive green while the other side (Herbst/autumn) features black,russet and tan amoebic shapes over olive green and beige splintered pattern background .Although custom made helmet covers were made the only offIcal-produced item of either pattern was a post war zelt bahn which sported a detachable hood that could be used as a carrying pouch.

    Regards Mark K

    PS. I wonder if the M43 shown was custom made for a BW soldat
    Last edited by Mark K; 01-13-2012 at 04:32 PM. Reason: Add information
    Always on the look out for WW II Canadian Helmets and Cam nets to add to my collection.

    Found a Canadian Mk II Medics Helmet and yes I know they are about as rare as hens teeth !!!!!

  9. #8

    Default Re: variations of the Bundeswehr camo

    brilliant info mark i think you may be right ill have to go get one now so we can find out

  10. #9

    Default Re: variations of the Bundeswehr camo

    Good thread, Tom!

    Regards

  11. #10

    Default Re: variations of the Bundeswehr camo

    Very interesting thread Tom! I never realised you had such knowledge of Bundeswehr field clothing, and finely written too, well done!!

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

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