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Was "Gordon" a military Tam o'shanter maker ?

Article about: G'day gents , does this maker label look familiar ? Gordon made in Scotland 100% wool Civilian or regimental ? Many thanks .

  1. #1

    Default Was "Gordon" a military Tam o'shanter maker ?

    G'day gents , does this maker label look familiar ?

    Gordon made in Scotland 100% wool


    Civilian or regimental ?

    Many thanks .

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  2. #2

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    Civvie cap with civvie label IMFO
    Regards,

    Jerry

    Whatever its just an opinion.

  3. #3

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    100% civilian. Bears no resemblance to any military uniform item.

    During my service I had the pleasure to serve beside every Scots regiment in the army (1975 - 1999) including Guards and cavalry regiments and I don't think I every saw even a colonels wife wearing a bonnet like that. Plenty on Princess St in Edinburgh though

    Seriously though, I can't think of a single example of scots troops wearing tartan bonnets, after the 18th century anyway.

    Hope this helps.

    Regards

    Mark
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  4. #4

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    Thanks gents , the only reason I ask is I've seen regimental kilts with the same name.

  5. #5

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    "Ma hat....Gimme back ma wee bonnet......!!!"

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    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  6. #6

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    I think I will throw it on the teapot .

  7. #7

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    Quote by Australia View Post
    Thanks gents , the only reason I ask is I've seen regimental kilts with the same name.
    Perfectly understandable thought process!

    It is not at all uncommon to find civilian type labels in dress / walking out (aka "undress") uniform items for most regiments as these type of item is often made by "military" tailors who are really civilian outfitters with military approvals (not always though) to supply specified patterns and such items are just as often private purchases.
    This is particularly true in the Scots regiments with things like kilts, plaids and cetain headress which are traditional Scots dress and these outfitters supply these garments to the general public. In some cases there will be very little or even no difference at all between items supplied as uniform and those supplied as civilian attire.
    With regiments not wearing this kind of national dress (English or Welsh for example) this is much less problematic. An example here would be the "British Warm" or Burberry "Trench coat" both items that were originally civilian garments but were aimed specifically at British Army officers and gained official approval for wear in uniform. Both these are very evident in civilian wear today (would young fashionistas be so keen on Burberry if they were aware of the history?) Usually such differences relate to quality (excluding regimental distinctions etc) and in this respect it could be either that is the better depending on where and to whom it is supplied. Of course there are also items acquired through the supply chain under government contract and they will usually have a label with some kind of military nomenclature. Again, just to be helpful to us collectors, this is not always the case. Sometimes because a label is not appropriate as it would be visible, it originally had a paper adhesive label which has fallen off / been removed, the permanent label has worn away (usually leaves a trace) or simply that the contract spec did not include a label. In the case of such items as kilts, although uncommon it is not unheard of for a military stock label and a tailors label to exist together on the same garment.

    Confused yet? You will be!!

    I hope this doesn't stir up too much mud!

    Regards

    Mark
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  8. #8

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    Erroneous re-post
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  9. #9

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    Thanks for the information mark , much appreciated !

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