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Cap Making

Article about: Ladies and Gentlemen, encouraged by and with the consent of F.-B. (thanks a lot for the encouragement) I publish the pages of Hempe's book relevant for visor cap making. This also involves a

  1. #31

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    Thanks ErWe from Salzburg. I really do appreciate this gesture.
    "Wir sollen auch unser Leben für die Brüder lassen" (1.Joh.3.16):
    zum Gedächtnis Wilhelm Schenk. Er starb fürs Vaterland am 13. Juni 1916

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  3. #32

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    Quote by ErWeSa View Post
    Hello F.-B.,
    you have already postet the last cap in thread # 34 elsewhere and already then I was amazed at the unusual piping. Is this piqué?

    Wilhelm: your consignment is already on the way.
    I do not know what this piping is, some cotton, I think....or wool.

    The cap is wholly real, it is an odd variation from the year 1935, I think. The sweatband is marked and I restored the RZM tag on it.
    damit, basta.

  4. #33
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    Dear Sir,
    hard to tell from the pictures but I just checked on my white-top LW summer caps. The piqué piping of the piqué tops (although thinner) show the same pattern. I think this is a very unusual cotton piqué piping on a trikot cap.

  5. #34

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    Quote by ErWeSa View Post
    Dear Sir,
    hard to tell from the pictures but I just checked on my white-top LW summer caps. The piqué piping of the piqué tops (although thinner) show the same pattern. I think this is a very unusual cotton piqué piping on a trikot cap.
    The cap is unique in my experience. I cannot decipher it. Maybe the original piping was removed and someone added this wider piping as an affectation or because the original piping was damaged.
    There is a large Delle in the fiber peak, as if it was knocked off someone's head.
    I am very fond of the cap. The SS runics are cut out of the lining. There is a story here, but I am not wholly sure what it is.
    It is not one of the several caps that was never worn, it has character.
    damit, basta.

  6. #35

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    and the identity of "MJ" is lost to time, as well.
    Last edited by Friedrich-Berthold; 03-28-2015 at 05:41 PM.
    damit, basta.

  7. #36
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    For many of today's consumers almost unimaginable: instead of throwing things away they can be repaired. Somewhere in this forum I saw the ad of a cap firm offering the exchange of pipings on a cap. Unimaginable for me, by the way, once such a cap is disassembled it is almost impossible to sew it together again, the seams are worn out, the fabric is dilated, nothingg fits together any more, a mess. I admire the Meister that they succeeded in doing so.

  8. #37

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    Quote by ErWeSa View Post
    For many of today's consumers almost unimaginable: instead of throwing things away they can be repaired. Somewhere in this forum I saw the ad of a cap firm offering the exchange of pipings on a cap. Unimaginable for me, by the way, once such a cap is disassembled it is almost impossible to sew it together again, the seams are worn out, the fabric is dilated, nothingg fits together any more, a mess. I admire the Meister that they succeeded in doing so.
    Bravo. You know whereof you speak, and this fact makes me chary of the assertions about how easily and with little fuss are these things so deftly remade.

    The Wellhausen Hannover catalog mentions that the nice women there could fix the cap, and, I think, the Kleiderkasse der Luftwaffe also included this service to its patrons.

    Clothing used to be sold because of its quality, and part of its quality was its durability.

    And with durability was its capacity for repair, and to its repair belonged the handicrafts to do so....

    All part of a vanished world in our big data in the big box, rattling Click image for larger version. 

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    damit, basta.

  9. #38
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    Nachtrag
    Hempe describes (see p. 79 in post # 9) the Roßhaarverarbeitung. This means that a reinforcement fabric made of horsehair covered by natural rubber is ironed on the side panels before they are sewn together. This safes you the lining and the padding. I enclosed pictures of such a cap - a Peküro Feuerschutzpolizei which was used on after the war hence the insignia. Hempe suggests that the seams have to be edged unless the fabric doesnt fringe such as Tuch which was done in this case despite the fact that the fabric of this hat doesn't fringe. Efficient way of making a cap, personally I prefer those with a lining.
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  10. #39

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    Bravo.
    damit, basta.

  11. #40

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ID:	821842For my friend in Salzburg, here is a Vorlage for your reflection.
    damit, basta.

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