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Muetzenfabrik

Article about: F.B. Reichenbach is about 10 km (6 miles) away from me. If you want, I'll make a photo of the building. If it is still standing.

  1. #121

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    F-B, as you know, the tailors also had their own trade publications, none of which have been translated, and most of which have not even been posted on the net.

    Here is one (which, if I recall correctly, is safely in the hands of a fellow member of this forum):
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  3. #122

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    In addition, there was another tailoring trade publication put out weekly during the TR called "Der Schneidermeister", of which I have just one issue.
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  4. #123
    ?

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Stone -

    Thanks to you (and F-B and others) for these images.

    One of the best discussions I have ever read, on any forum.

  5. #124
    ?

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Stone -

    I do in fact have a copy of this Der Schneidermeister, according to my list, though I am unsure of where it is. I list the notation "Band 1" if that is of any help.

    Should I dig this out?

  6. #125

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Quote by Frog View Post
    Stone -

    I do in fact have a copy of this Der Schneidermeister, according to my list, though I am unsure of where it is. I list the notation "Band 1" if that is of any help.

    Should I dig this out?
    Yes, you should.

    Please show it to us.
    damit, basta.

  7. #126

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Quote by Friedrich-Berthold View Post
    Yes, you should.

    Please show it to us.
    Ditto. I will also try to scan mine.
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  8. #127
    ?

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    I will do this, for sure.

    Bought it at a jumble sale a few years ago, for 50p it shows.

    It is no doubt still in the cellar in the UK; we will be back there in a couple of weeks and I will find it.

  9. #128

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    My scanner is not working the best, but you get the idea. There are ads for Thiele & Steinart, who made much in the way of bullion insignia during the war, and whose proof pieces were discovered in a horde find after the war.

    There is also an ad for a hat-maker from Berlin, "Max Pahlke"--I have yet to see a hat made by this firm. There is also a classified section in which various tailoring houses are seeking tailors, to include Georg Kurz of Braunschweig. It appears there was a shortage of tailors during the war.

    The magazine also focuses on the Zivil market, and there is even a section entitled: "Fur die Frau Meisterin". Further, in my issue, the Govt Official uniforms are profiled.
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  10. #129

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    The magazine bills itself as "Deutschlands grosste Schneiderzeitung"!
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  11. #130

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Quote by stonemint View Post
    My scanner is not working the best, but you get the idea. There are ads for Thiele & Steinart, who made much in the way of bullion insignia during the war, and whose proof pieces were discovered in a horde find after the war.

    There is also an ad for a hat-maker from Berlin, "Max Pahlke"--I have yet to see a hat made by this firm. There is also a classified section in which various tailoring houses are seeking tailors, to include Georg Kurz of Braunschweig. It appears there was a shortage of tailors during the war.

    The magazine also focuses on the Zivil market, and there is even a section entitled: "Fur die Frau Meisterin". Further, in my issue, the Govt Official uniforms are profiled.
    Thanks for this. This periodical was obviously intended for a wider and different readership than the UM. The shortage of uniform tailors and Facharbeiter (i.e. the people who performed various tasks) started well before 1 September 1939. I believe that the uniform trade expanded some 300% from 1934 until about 1938, and one can only imagine the experience after the actual start of war, though the kinds of uniforms were transformed by the needs of the battlefield.

    This, Mr. Chris, brings me to a point where I parted company with the less enlightened hat savant internet gurus, who have postulated that a given firm followed a signature style without surcease from 1920 until 1950. The turnover in all of this must have been quite high, the shortages perpetual, the need to cut costs and accommodate the change in the raw material markets very intense, pi pa po. The journals themselves speak of this constantly, and yet, the archeological approach as well as what one figure of note has called "old wives tales and gossip" & hobbyist approach takes no notice of these forces whatsoever. My point: forces in state, society, economy and even the European system of states, as well as regime ideology compel the manner of making things to adapt and change. This idea of some monumental, block like method of cap making does not hold up when seen in the light of the truth that comes strongly from all these periodicals. To be sure, this phenomenon is somewhat analyzed in the leading Schiffer book, but without the necessary insight and context that the facts demand. I do not imagine the writer in this case had sufficient background in modern German history to make sense of alot of it, having invested so much energy in making a list and also through the diligent examination of patents. But context is even more important, that is, the faces, the names, the places, and the system itself.

    Younger people today who live in corporate mega entities with huge command and control structures imagine that Nazi Germany was like McDonald's or you name it global corporation, with a huge enforcement mechanism of lemming like people. There was a state terror organization, it is true, but it relied on everyone denouncing people of whom they were jealous and the propaganda of fear that was a part of it. Otherwise, Germany was, and remains, a pluralistic place, with many approaches, and also with the same traits of human nature as operate in most places. To be sure, there existed bureaucracies, but it is also true that compliance, obedience, and above all: standardization were far less a feature of peoples' lives than they sadly are today.




    Sapere aude.



    Thank you for adding to our Panoptikum of images.

    With our united efforts, we can make a dent in things.
    damit, basta.

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