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Muetzenfabrik

Article about: F.B. Reichenbach is about 10 km (6 miles) away from me. If you want, I'll make a photo of the building. If it is still standing.

  1. #31

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    On the other side of the spectrum, here is a small maker identified by our Italian friend Enorepap--
    Max Seebrecht, located in Kassel:

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  3. #32

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    It seems that most hat makers, large or small, were involved in the manufacture of "Zylinderhut" from 1900-1939. Out of all German headgear, a great many of these survived, due to the fact that they were usually protected by their cases they were sold in, and to the fact they were limited to formal occasions. They provicde an excellent source of confirming a maker, and his location--in this case, for Seebrecht:
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  4. #33

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Mayser is still in business and makes highly fashionable head wear at a high price. I think I own one of their felt hats I bought in Wien.

    As you know, the RZM divided the head wear or cap industry into those firms with industrial production and those with artisanal production. What you likely do not know is that with the advent of the III. Reich, a shortage of skilled unfirom cap makers eventuated, granted the depression, and the UM has a lot of articles on the need to increase rapidly the skilled hands to make the objects we collect. This fact comes through in my cap making book, too. (not that I wrote it, but I bought it....UM sold it too...) The cap making industry and trade was highly cyclical, having lost its military base after 1918 and only regained same with suddenness in 1933 with the onset of the Nazis and then rearmament. There are many articles on this score.

    The UM also makes much of the process of rationalization and greater efficiency as a result of Taylorism, which despite the Nazi emphasis on artisans and the preservation of the estates and the guilds, nonetheless was also manifest in the new regime. That is, Fordism, production line making more bang for the buck nonsense with which we are still suffocated almost 100 years later. This push pull between the need to become a big, speedy, and efficient organization versus the need to uphold quality and standards associated with guilds and the estates is also quite dramatic in the articles. Further, there is much made about the perils of lowering quality to cut prices and otherwise adjust to the mass demand for uniform caps. This is where the UM is especially interesting as concerns the real dynamics of what was, in fact, a highly controlled market and why, for instance, my own area of black SS caps declined in quality of make in the course of the 1930s. That is, the dominant role of endless rigid price controls and oversight of the market via the RZM as well as the imperative of the cap makers to keep out the cheapo imitator, which was also a Nazi racist argument used to drive Jews out of the clothing trade.
    Uniformenmarkt is not quite as Jew baiting as Stuermer, but it surely is up there.

    You should know that the Nazi war economy, which really began in the course of 1936-1937 gave full employment, but it also used up all the foreign reserves and otherwise overheated the German economy is a highly profound way. This fact also emerges in the editions of UM prior to 1939. Thus the boom in these objects was not associated, per se, with limitless profits in a free market. Quite the opposite. I am not an economist, but plainly these firms operated somewhat between the devil and the deep blue sea as regards business conditions.

    Also more interesting to think about than dumbo cap badges.

    Happy hats and I urge those who read here to invest in Berlitz or subject these things here to a translator automat.

    Happy new year and thanks for the nice hat advertising and thingies.
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    damit, basta.

  5. #34

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Regarding UM, the ad for Gustav Oelkers caught my eye. They were very close to a major competitor, Steinmetz & Hehl, who also had an office on Rodingsmarkt.

    It looks like they survived the war, at least for a short while. Here is a BRD/BGS visor they made sometime after the war (I would go as far as to say the 1970's):
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  6. #35

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    More factory ephemera. These are from the renowned firm of HPC, which utilized a characteristic airflow system which allowed it to be closed off. Once again, a major concern, even in the Imperial era. Where are those business records now? Is the only evidence of this once-booming factory a few "fetid woolens" and these scraps of paper?
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  7. #36

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Same questions for another late, lamented maker--Leonhard Paulig, aka "Leparo":
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  8. #37

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Quote by stonemint View Post
    More factory ephemera. These are from the renowned firm of HPC, which utilized a characteristic airflow system which allowed it to be closed off. Once again, a major concern, even in the Imperial era. Where are those business records now? Is the only evidence of this once-booming factory a few "fetid woolens" and these scraps of paper?

    Thanks for the nice things. Our mutual friend in Wisconsin says that someone has the Lubstein papers, but this strikes me as far fetched.
    The starting point for this quest is the with the good army museums in Bavaria, Baden, Berlin/Prussia, Dresden/Saxony and Wien/Austria. There are people there who would know where to begin the search. And there are plainly other collectors in Germany and elsewhere in central Europe with some insight into all of this that is less at hand in No, America.
    damit, basta.

  9. #38

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Here some more images of note:

    a soldier admires caps in a shop window.
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    damit, basta.

  10. #39

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Such attractive shop windows...

    And, for urban, pedestrian customers....and how many people drove automobiles, then?.....this would be a major means of attracting sales.
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    damit, basta.

  11. #40

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Here is the man I would have liked to meet, this is Eberhard Assmann, a pioneer of the RZM system, who established the organization in East Berlin, on the Lutzowstrasse.

    He was from the Luedenscheid regalia firm but was an alter Kaempfer in the SA and typical of the kind of organizational wizards in the midst of the Kampfzeit that made the NSDAP and the SA a dominant force--even in Berlin.

    The article about him from 1937 lists the long group of regalia, uniform, insignia, and orders and decorations makers who were Nazis from the first hour, including Clemens Wagner of Braunschweig, among many and got in on the ground floor of the RZM structure. The article asserts that the RZM was ordered into existence in late 1928 and stood from early 1929.
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    damit, basta.

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