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Muetzenfabrik

Article about: F.B. Reichenbach is about 10 km (6 miles) away from me. If you want, I'll make a photo of the building. If it is still standing.

  1. #1

    Default Muetzenfabrik

    Most people think of the hat makers as small cottage makers working out of their houses. While those did exist, cap making was a huge industry before (and during) WW2.

    This is a pic of the Fewegla factory during the imperial era (they also made the collapsible top-hat):
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    Last edited by stonemint; 01-28-2017 at 08:07 PM.
    NEC SOLI CEDIT

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  3. #2

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Here is another major concern--the J. Huckel u. Sohn Hutfabrik, which was based in the former Sudeten town of Neutitschein.

    They were the premier Fedora maker in the world before WW2.
    After the war, being Sudeten Germans, the factory was confiscated and re-named "tonak".

    The factory, during the war, made primarily Tropenhelm for the DAK, most of it the felt type. (their products are stamped "JHS" on the leather sweatbands of the pith helmets).

    As I have said before , I could learn more in a day walking either of these factories than all my lifetime of trying to study these "foetid woolens".....
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  4. #3

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Thanks for this. You should also post the RZM breakdown of licenses which Bender published 15 or so years ago. Wilkins makes the point that this head wear industry and trade was a combination of what you show here as a part of the industrial revolution, but also as part of the crafts and trades. Americans of a tender age today do not really understand this fact, granted that the trades and crafts are a marginal feature of life ( at least where I live), whereas the tradition exists in Europe today with greater force.

    Also, I saw your post on the Moravian hat maker, which was, in fact, prior to the end of Habsburg Monarchy, located in Vienna and in Moravian Silesia, i.e. that part of Moravia in the north towards Poland. K u K Lieferant means also that the firm was a contractor to the Habsburg court, state and agencies.

    My hat making book from 1935 goes into all of this in great detail. One day I should translate same. Also, I promise to share what I find once I get the Rosetta stone from Uniformenmarkt.

    Thanks for showing us these advertisements.

    The books in German on the textile industry and the clothing industry and trades are very revealing and interesting on these themes.

    BenVK posted a very useful title which I am still meaning to buy when I am next in Mitteleuropa....quite soon.
    damit, basta.

  5. #4

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Quote by stonemint View Post
    Here is another major concern--the J. Huckel u. Sohn Hutfabrik, which was based in the former Sudeten town of Neutitschein.

    They were the premier Fedora maker in the world before WW2.
    After the war, being Sudeten Germans, the factory was confiscated and re-named "tonak".

    The factory, during the war, made primarily Tropenhelm for the DAK, most of it the felt type. (their products are stamped "JHS" on the leather sweatbands of the pith helmets).

    As I have said before , I could learn more in a day walking either of these factories than all my lifetime of trying to study these "foetid woolens".....
    The question with this is what happened to it from 1919 until 1938 and then thereafter. The Sudeten Germans were ethnically cleansed by the Benes decrees ca. 1945, but you should find out what this firm did in the CSR period of the interwar. This locale is not especially far from Bruenn, Brno, the captial of Moravia. And all of this is not especially far from Vienna. In fact, the Moravians in their number made up a large part of Vienna such that they irritated the young Schikelgruber.

    I had a JHS pith helmet as a kid. It cost all of 5 dollars. I did not know they originated in Moravia. I was told they were found in Belgium.

    You places in Saxony and Moravia are all still there, or the towns are. You would do well to go there and look for the people who did work there, if they are still alive and sentient.

    On the Zentralverzeichnis antiquarischer Buecher the archive of a Munich sewing machine maker is for sale, and it has a lot of interesting material in it for a rather staggering price. I posted a picture from an album of all the trades tailors and hat makers that used their machines. It is here someplace. The apprentices in 1935 were very young men (13-15 years old), some of whom still might be alive.

    I went in search of all of this recently in Munich, but did not have time to follow up.

    Happy boxes and happier felt.

    Thanks for sharing all the nice data. Much better than a round and round discussion about pitted aluminum found in some imagined battlefield in the form of a "scull."
    damit, basta.

  6. #5

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Who worked here and what of their knowledge endures today? When this advert was made our regalia was called "Hitlerkleidung." This is surely not a major hat factory with an industrial basis, but a retail firm that surely became a license holder of the RZM in the 1930s.
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    damit, basta.

  7. #6

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    On the theme of Moravia and Germans or Habsburg Austrians in what later became the CSR and today the Czech Republic, here is a cap from Saaz in Egerland. It is an enlisted cap that was embellished with a velvet band and nicer insignia.

    This cap is in the Wilkins book.

    Saaz and the Egerland are in western Bohemia, a region of hops production and also industrial development in the urban areas.

    This cap itself was made in northern Germany.

    I diverge from the cap making Fabriken, but we should continue the visual record of these places via inquiry with the trades museums in such places as Braunschweig or Berlin or Munich.

    The confluence of western Slavs and Germans/Austrians is an endlessly interesting one.
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    damit, basta.

  8. #7

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    F-B, I think you, me and maybe 4 others really appreciate the art of the hat-maker, and the history behind it all. It is amazing that there is such a dearth of information on all these Muetzenfabriken, when the era we are interested in ended only 65 years ago.

    I would gladly pay for a translation of your book, but until then, I will have to content myself with your snippets of information. I also look forward to your reviews of Uniformenmarkt. Up until now, it has been the province of the dagger, uniform and insignia collectors.

    What has also puzzled me has been the lack of catalogs and advertising material as far as the haberdashers are concerned. You will see a multitude of advertising gimmicks from the various blade makers (calenders, stand-ups, miniatures, catalogs, etc) but I have yet to run across a single item for the headgear concerns. Based upon my very non-scientific research, there were many more headgear makers than blade makers, and it hat to be that much more competitive as a result. So how did they compete for the same piece of the pie, aside from the token ads in Uniformenmarkt we have all seen? Where are the "salesman samples" for headgear? Wouldn't Erel have put out a nice, glossy catalog of their wares similar to Eickhorn? If not, why not? (I ask myself questions like these all the time, but I am sure the answers are hidden away in some dust old attic in the former DDR).
    NEC SOLI CEDIT

  9. #8

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Here is a pre-war (WW1) catalog from a Hutmacher. Would the same not have existed from 1933-45?
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  10. #9

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    A page from this Austrian maker's catalog:
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  11. #10

    Default Re: Muetzenfabrik

    Yours is a fine question for which the answer exists in Ingolstadt and Berlin and also in Vienna in the respective military museums there.

    It also exists in Dresden in the Bundeswehr museum which is in the process of becoming the leading museum in Germany for military things.

    You should make a trip there and I shall make the introductions for you.


    In the case of the Bavarian museum, the Proben, i.e. the pattern examples given out to the contractors, seem to be in a good state of preservation. The volumes from Militaria Verlag that I have pushed here contain them.

    But I am not aware that Lubstein or Mueller or whatever had catalogs per se, like Assmann and the blades firms, since the nature of their business was different. But there was quite a market for extra items of clothing, so you are right to posit the existence of some means to propagate wares and compete for such business that existed in all major places and many minors ones. too.

    As luck would have it, by March I shall be better able to answer your query. Let us see what I can turn up.

    Merry Christmas, happy new year and happy Muetzenbodengolderei!
    damit, basta.

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