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Postschutz Headgear in Period Photographs

Article about: Various wartime pictures of Postschutz men..... Credits : Stonemint , ea-antik , hoose27

  1. #41

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    Join the Postschutz, get an Audi (or Auto Union):

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  3. #42

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    Postschutz officers meeting with v. Ribbentrop:
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  4. #43

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    NCO with the visor appears to be wearing a WH wreath:
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  5. #44

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    Early 30's P/S photo.
    Although censored, note the wear of an NSDAP brassard and the very rare Postschutz cufftitle:
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  6. #45

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    Tellerform portrait:
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  7. #46

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    Officer. Note wear of WH eagle:
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    Last edited by stonemint; 04-28-2015 at 12:30 AM.
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  8. #47

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    Thanks so much for the pix of period wear! ver nice to find.
    I own one of these (Eastern satalite ) visors.... and an early buckle to match, I'd like to ask where an English speaker could find a simple outline/explanation of the duties of the postshutz, and the years it was authorized/enabled? There doesn't seem to be much out there for non-German speakers - readers on this subject.

    Regards, mitch

  9. #48

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    Quote by rynegold View Post
    I'd like to ask where an English speaker could find a simple outline/explanation of the duties of the postshutz, and the years it was authorized/enabled? There doesn't seem to be much out there for non-German speakers - readers on this subject.
    The Postschutz was raised in March 1933.

    In the early days of the Nazi regime, there was fear of civil unrest and especially of Communist sabotage actions. Before this background, the mission of the Postschutz was to provide armed protection to Reichspost installations (post-, telegraph- and telephone offices, wireless transmitting stations, other technical facilities, directorates etc.), as an equivalent to the Reichsbahn's Bahnschutz.
    In addition to this, it provided a degree of military training to its members and served as an unofficial extension of the police and the armed forces. (At the time of the service's creation, the Reichswehr was still the small 100,000-men-strong force regulated by the Versailles treaty and no conscription or reserve system existed.)

    Its personnel was exclusively recruited from male Reichspost officials, -employees and -workers. The vast majority of them fulfilled their Postschutz duties in addition to their regular responsibilities. (There was only a very small percentage of full-time Postschutz personnel: For example, in 1941, the service had a total of ca. 42,000 members. Out of these, only some 900 to 1,000 - i.e. less than 3 % - were exclusively employed in Postschutz duties. (No doubt the percentage was much smaller still in peacetime.)

    The Postschutz soon came under serious criticism: Just a few years after its creation, the Nazi regime was firmly in power, all real danger of uprisings and Communist sabotage had been eliminated, conscription had been re-introduced and the armed forces had been built up massively. Many felt that the Postschutz had outlived its usefulness and was a massive waste of tax money and effort.

    Still, despite some demands to this effect, it was not disbanded; not the least due to plans of future war and conquest. It temporarily grew in importance with the annexations of 1938/1939 and the outbreak of WW2 and the subsequent gain of new territories in 1939/1940, but again lost importance and started to fade into insignificance when the situation in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia, the Generalgouvernement in Poland and the occupied western areas had been consolidated.

    However, with the campaign against the Soviet Union of 1941, it would soon grow in importance again, all the more so when the tide of war would begin to turn.

    In Mai 1942, the Postschutz came under SS control and became the SS-Postschutz. It was re-organized, re-uniformed and once again built up.

    During the late stages of the war with fronts collapsing and large-scale retreats taking place, Postschutz men in the occupied territories increasingly found themselves serving in more or less a purely military role, defending postal installations and fighting as light infantry in evacuation and rearguard actions.

    The best publication on the subject is "Der Postschutz und Postluftschutz im Dritten Reich und den besetzten Gebieten", a very informative and thorough study of the Postschutz' history with many period documents (letters, regulations, forms etc.) either photographically reproduced or quoted verbatim as well as a handsome selection of period photographs of Postschutz personnel, -installations etc. It also provides useful information on uniforms and insignia, with some charts and tables. However, it is only available in German.
    Last edited by HPL2008; 06-06-2015 at 12:50 PM.

  10. #49

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    Postschutz EM. It appears he is wearing the "SS-Postschutz" cufftitle.
    Credit: Ferdinandmax
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  11. #50

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    Rare photo and hard to find. I had seen the photo already at another forum (WAF),
    where it was shown also, but it is good to show it here for the WRF-members also.
    The cufftitle SS-Postschutz is a hard to get item. One is shown in the mentioned
    book by HPL2008 from Michael Schweizer (see image).

    Click image for larger version. 

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    A good friend of mine also owns one and I was able to oberserve it during a visit
    there. The cufftitle came into being when the Postschutz came under the control
    of the SS (May 1942).
    "Wir sollen auch unser Leben für die Brüder lassen" (1.Joh.3.16):
    zum Gedächtnis Wilhelm Schenk. Er starb fürs Vaterland am 13. Juni 1916

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