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James D. Duncan's war loot and mementos- intact collection- (Picture heavy)

Article about: by BOB COLEMAN The cap eagle is not political but the civil model. It appears to be gilt finish which would have come off a Reichsbahn cap, which is the German Railway system. The cap would

  1. #41

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    The silver colored star with the screw back is from an Italian WWII collar tab.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

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  3. #42

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    Quote by JamesWatson View Post
    I see. The pins are different on the link I attached than those on Duncan's bring-back, but I suppose they probably had all different kinds of ways of attaching them. Civilian cap it is then!

    JW
    The eagles on caps were all attached with prongs. The style and material differed from manufacturer to manufacturer. Material could also change due to war shortages.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  4. #43

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    Quote by Wagriff View Post
    The silver colored star with the screw back is from an Italian WWII collar tab.
    Thanks! Another scratched off the list.

  5. #44

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    I forgot to add, that the button with the shield and cross beneath the crown is also Italian...
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  6. #45

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    great collection of His military history. It is always great to see this kind of history preserved. We see all kinds of items with no history attached and I think it is great to have this attached to these things.
    Thanks for sharing these with us and I enjoyed reading this thread.

    John
    I specialize in M1 carbines and Lugers.

  7. #46

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    Quote by Wagriff View Post
    I forgot to add, that the button with the shield and cross beneath the crown is also Italian...
    Thanks! I thought so.

  8. #47

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    Quote by guns ltd View Post
    great collection of His military history. It is always great to see this kind of history preserved. We see all kinds of items with no history attached and I think it is great to have this attached to these things.
    Thanks for sharing these with us and I enjoyed reading this thread.

    John
    Glad you enjoyed it! I think it might get donated to a museum eventually. Could make for an interesting exhibit. I like how it portrays the "everymans" experience. He wasn't an officer or a pilot or something. Just a GI on the ground with his tools, and historical fascination with places he'd never been to before.

  9. #48

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    James - As to the use of the 20mm, the dimensions of the cartridge will give you an idea of the weapon it was used in. Measure the height in MM and you should be able to match it up Must admit, from the photos it doesn't look 'short' to me,

  10. #49
    ?

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    Interesting to see one vets hoard from the war.

  11. #50

    Default 20x138 115g

    I believe it's a 20x138mm shell.

    20x138B


    "This was the second of the 20mm cannon cartridges developed by Solothurn in the 1930s, and is known as the "Long Solothurn" round. It proved far more successful than the 20x105B, being primarily used in the highly successful FlaK 30 and 38 AA guns which were extensively used by German forces in WW2 (and remained in service in some nations for decades after the war). It was also used in the KwK 30 and 38 light AFV guns, and in the Solothurn S18-1000 series anti-tank rifles.
    As well as being used in these German and Swiss weapons, it was used in the Finnish Lahti L39 anti-tank rifle and L40 AA gun, and in the Italian Breda M35 and Scotti cannon. A very wide range of ammunition was developed for this gun, including M-geschoss shells and Pzgr 40 tungsten-cored AP."

    (from An introduction to collecting 20 mm cannon cartridges The 20 mm automatic cannon first saw service during World War 1 but achieved its)

    Now just to narrow it down to what gun it would have been fed through. Can't find any exact matches on the yellow projectile. It's marked "115g," "p.327," "16e38" and a waffenamt "WaA285".

    This from wikipedia - 2 cm Flak 30/38/Flakvierling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    "German designation: Sprenggranatpatrone L'spur mit Zerleger HE-T 115grams 6.0 g HE (PETN) Nose fuzed tracer round, self-destruct at 5.5 seconds (2000m range) due to tracer burn-through."

    Same weight (115g) as indicated on the yellow projectile. Think I might have a match

    The bottom of the shell casing is labeled "38 86 C P181." Maybe the 38 is for "Flak 38" as seen here in this infamous scene from Saving Private Ryan.

    Click image for larger version. 

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