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Medals to Irishmen in WW1.

Article about: This is a British War medal (BWM)to Pte.Francis Moore 10057 2nd Royal Dublin Fusiliers from St johns Place, Athy,Co.Kildare.Moore was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his actions

  1. #31

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    14 Star trio to Pvt.James O'Brien 8274 2nd battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers Taken POW at Etreux 27th August 1914, was held at Giessen POW camp.First World War : The Battle of Étreux
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    Last edited by renmore; 08-22-2013 at 12:37 AM.

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  3. #32

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    14 Star Trio to Pte.Patrick Daniels 4352 2nd Royal Irish Regiment taken POW at the action at Le Pilly on the 17th October 1914 during the battle of Le Bassee Battle of La Bassée, 10 October-2 November 1914 He Managed to write a letter home to his local newspaper in 1916.
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  4. #33

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    14 Star trio to Pte.Patrick Flynn 6833 2nd Connaught Rangers taken POW during the rearguard action at Le Grand Fayt 26th August 1914, flynn was one of six brothers from Ballina co.Mayo serving in the Connaught Rangers, they all survived the war and three of them were POW'S,2 In Germany, one in Bulgaria.Battle of Le Grand Fayt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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  5. #34

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    Another group to Captain Thomas Brady Royal Dublin Fusiliers, 25 years with the regiment and went from private to captain.

    Thomas Richard Brady was born July 7, 1878 to Anne and Patrick Brady of Dublin. He signed his Attestation Paper on June 17, 1897 at Curragh Camp in Dublin, Ireland, stating that he was 18 years and 11 months of age, that he had previous military service in the 4th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, that he was not married and that his trade as that of Clerk. He served at home from July 17, 1897 until December 23, 1898, after which he was sent to South Africa, where the 2nd Dublins were based in Natal Colony and where they would still be when the Boer War began in 1899. Brady was promoted to Corporal on October 22, 1899 and is credited with having been there from December 24, 1898 until February 11, 1902, earning him the six clasp QSA and the two clasp KSA.
    After the war was over, he was transferred to the East Indies, from February 12, 1902 until November 8, 1903 where he also saw action in the Aden hinterland and interior. Promoted to Sergeant on October 16, 1902, and returning home thereafter, for two years. He is listed as having been in China from November 4, 1905 and posted as Sergeant, Chinese Regiment, until his departure on October 1, 1906. A request was received from the Commandant of the Shanghai Volunteer Corps, asking for a recommendation from the Commanding Officer, 2nd Dublin Fusiliers, in regards to the possible placement of Sergeant Brady in a possible vacancy in the stall of instructors in the Corps. The Commandant delivered a positive reply, stating that Brady was "an excellent accountant & clerk" and gave him a full recommendation. While serving at home for the next four years, in addition to his re-engaging for additional service on July 61908 at Naas, Ireland he qualified from the school of musketery at Hythe with distinction, and on his promotion to Colour Sergeant on February 19, 1909, he married at the age of 28, Abigail Bertha Matthews from Naas Co.Kildare aged 21, at Farham, on March 30, 1909. Brady is listed in his service records as having served in India from November 8, 1910 until December 23, 1914, although it is known that the 2nd Battalion itself left for Aldershot, England in 1910.
    The 2nd Battalion remained in England until the Great War began in 1914. What is confirmed is that he was Appointed Colour Sergeant Major on November 16, 1914 and stationed in England from December 24, 1914 until February 10, 1915. The 2nd Battalion RDF was now being prepared for action in the French and Belgian theatres, with Brady being promoted to 2nd Lieutenant on February 11, 1915. He arrived with the 2nd Battalion RDF in France on March 23, 1915, ready for action. The Battalion took part in all but one of the subsidiary battles during the Second Battle of Ypres that took place between April 22 and May 24, 1915. The Battalion suffered heavily at the Battle of St. Julien, the second subsidiary battle, incurring hundreds of casualties. Brady was involved in a gas attack here by the Germans, at the age of 37, on May 2, as documented in a Medical Report, "whilst in trenches in front of St. Julien, during an attack, gas was sent over from German trenches. The gas got into his throat and lungs making him gasp and cough but he went on with his work. He could not walk more than a few yards without feeling exhausted." The next day, he was sent to hospital, where he remained until May 7, after which he embarked for England from Boulogne, France for Dover aboard the ship, St. Patrick. He spent three weeks hospitalized but did recover from the effects of the gas poisoning, returning to duty in early June , again with the 2nd Battalion in the French theatre. One year later, the British launched the Somme offensive on July 1, 1916, with the 1st and 2nd Royal Dublin Fusiliers taking part in the First Day of the Battle of the Somme.Brady was made temporary Captain and was in command of A company on the 1/7/1916, his company led off the attack but could make little headway and suffered havy casualties,of the 502 men who left the trenches that morning 325 would become casualties. Brady himself was wounded on that very first day, suffering shell (shrapnel) wounds of his jaw and both legs. He was placed aboard the ship Oxfordshire, embarking Le Havre, France for Southampton, England on July 3, for treatment at St. Thomas Hospital in London. He was later transferred to his home country of Ireland, for additional treatment and convalescence at Central Military Hospital, Cork. The jaw mended well but a fever and the injured left knee continued to hobble him, imparing his general health. After several months and many medical reviews, he was deemed unfit for General Service but deemed fit for Home Service by a Medical Board. He was granted leave from the 2nd Battalion, RDF on November 16, 1916 as the result of his wounds suffered at the Somme and was placed with the 3rd Reserve Battalion, RDF at Cork.
    He remained at home for the duration of the war, seeing a promotion to Captain on June 6, 1918, his croix de guerre avec palme waas gazetted on the 15/12/1919 he retired from the army with the rank of Captain in July 1922 on the disbandment of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
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  6. #35
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    Quote by renmore View Post
    Another group to Captain Thomas Brady Royal Dublin Fusiliers, 25 years with the regiment and went from private to captain.

    Thomas Richard Brady was born July 7, 1878 to Anne and Patrick Brady of Dublin. He signed his Attestation Paper on June 17, 1897 at Curragh Camp in Dublin, Ireland, stating that he was 18 years and 11 months of age, that he had previous military service in the 4th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, that he was not married and that his trade as that of Clerk. He served at home from July 17, 1897 until December 23, 1898, after which he was sent to South Africa, where the 2nd Dublins were based in Natal Colony and where they would still be when the Boer War began in 1899. Brady was promoted to Corporal on October 22, 1899 and is credited with having been there from December 24, 1898 until February 11, 1902, earning him the six clasp QSA and the two clasp KSA.
    After the war was over, he was transferred to the East Indies, from February 12, 1902 until November 8, 1903 where he also saw action in the Aden hinterland and interior. Promoted to Sergeant on October 16, 1902, and returning home thereafter, for two years. He is listed as having been in China from November 4, 1905 and posted as Sergeant, Chinese Regiment, until his departure on October 1, 1906. A request was received from the Commandant of the Shanghai Volunteer Corps, asking for a recommendation from the Commanding Officer, 2nd Dublin Fusiliers, in regards to the possible placement of Sergeant Brady in a possible vacancy in the stall of instructors in the Corps. The Commandant delivered a positive reply, stating that Brady was "an excellent accountant & clerk" and gave him a full recommendation. While serving at home for the next four years, in addition to his re-engaging for additional service on July 61908 at Naas, Ireland he qualified from the school of musketery at Hythe with distinction, and on his promotion to Colour Sergeant on February 19, 1909, he married at the age of 28, Abigail Bertha Matthews from Naas Co.Kildare aged 21, at Farham, on March 30, 1909. Brady is listed in his service records as having served in India from November 8, 1910 until December 23, 1914, although it is known that the 2nd Battalion itself left for Aldershot, England in 1910.
    The 2nd Battalion remained in England until the Great War began in 1914. What is confirmed is that he was Appointed Colour Sergeant Major on November 16, 1914 and stationed in England from December 24, 1914 until February 10, 1915. The 2nd Battalion RDF was now being prepared for action in the French and Belgian theatres, with Brady being promoted to 2nd Lieutenant on February 11, 1915. He arrived with the 2nd Battalion RDF in France on March 23, 1915, ready for action. The Battalion took part in all but one of the subsidiary battles during the Second Battle of Ypres that took place between April 22 and May 24, 1915. The Battalion suffered heavily at the Battle of St. Julien, the second subsidiary battle, incurring hundreds of casualties. Brady was involved in a gas attack here by the Germans, at the age of 37, on May 2, as documented in a Medical Report, "whilst in trenches in front of St. Julien, during an attack, gas was sent over from German trenches. The gas got into his throat and lungs making him gasp and cough but he went on with his work. He could not walk more than a few yards without feeling exhausted." The next day, he was sent to hospital, where he remained until May 7, after which he embarked for England from Boulogne, France for Dover aboard the ship, St. Patrick. He spent three weeks hospitalized but did recover from the effects of the gas poisoning, returning to duty in early June , again with the 2nd Battalion in the French theatre. One year later, the British launched the Somme offensive on July 1, 1916, with the 1st and 2nd Royal Dublin Fusiliers taking part in the First Day of the Battle of the Somme.Brady was made temporary Captain and was in command of A company on the 1/7/1916, his company led off the attack but could make little headway and suffered havy casualties,of the 502 men who left the trenches that morning 325 would become casualties. Brady himself was wounded on that very first day, suffering shell (shrapnel) wounds of his jaw and both legs. He was placed aboard the ship Oxfordshire, embarking Le Havre, France for Southampton, England on July 3, for treatment at St. Thomas Hospital in London. He was later transferred to his home country of Ireland, for additional treatment and convalescence at Central Military Hospital, Cork. The jaw mended well but a fever and the injured left knee continued to hobble him, imparing his general health. After several months and many medical reviews, he was deemed unfit for General Service but deemed fit for Home Service by a Medical Board. He was granted leave from the 2nd Battalion, RDF on November 16, 1916 as the result of his wounds suffered at the Somme and was placed with the 3rd Reserve Battalion, RDF at Cork.
    He remained at home for the duration of the war, seeing a promotion to Captain on June 6, 1918, his croix de guerre avec palme waas gazetted on the 15/12/1919 he retired from the army with the rank of Captain in July 1922 on the disbandment of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
    Congratulations; a fine group to a true long service veteran. No LSGC medal?

    BobS

  7. #36

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    Quote by BobS View Post
    Congratulations; a fine group to a true long service veteran. No LSGC medal?

    BobS
    It appears he was just short of the 18years service, also think he had couple of blips on his record.

  8. #37

    Default A long way from Tipperary!

    A 1914 Star to PTE.Thomas Healy 1st Connaught Rangers, he arrived in France/Flanders in September 1914,was wounded in March 1915 and was discharged due to wounds in 1916, he was from Silver Street,Nenagh,Co.Tipperary, Ireland.I have attached a letter he sent to his local newspaper"The Nenagh Guardian" in May 1915.
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  9. #38

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    Excellent medals.

  10. #39
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    This is fantastic. Thanks for the post. I am fairly sure George Nesbitt was my grandmothers brother. He along with his brother William enlisted in Aug 1914 soon after the war stated. Where is the medal? I would love to see it if on public display. Garnet

  11. #40
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    Thank you so much for posting these pictures. Anthony Kilkenny was my great uncle. I knew he was in the war and heard the story that he was injured, but had no idea that these medals existed. It means the world to see these. Thank you!

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