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Blunt tip on Red Cross Daggers

Article about: my question is whether anyone knows that the daggers of the German Red Cross have blunt tip what is the purpose or use? thank you Annoyed from this ads?  

  1. #1

    Default Blunt tip on Red Cross Daggers

    my question is whether anyone knows that the daggers of the German Red Cross have "blunt tip" what is the purpose or use? thank you
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  3. #2
    MAP
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    It was to identify it as a non military (i.e. aggressive) weapon

    Regards,

    Michael
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  4. #3

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    I always assumed it was because the role of the DRK was to heal and not harm. A symbolic feature.

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    MAP
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    Quote by KradSpam View Post
    I always assumed it was because the role of the DRK was to heal and not harm. A symbolic feature.
    I have read that the blunt tips were to identify it as a non-combatant "tool" instead of a weapon. Also to protect the individual if they were captured.

    It was not only the germans who did this. I have a WWI US Sprinfield Armory Hospital Corp bolo knife that has a rounded edge.

    But I suppose your theory could be correct as well. They are not mutual exclusive......

    Regards,

    Michael
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  6. #5

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    Quote by KradSpam View Post
    I always assumed it was because the role of the DRK was to heal and not harm. A symbolic feature.
    but why teeth? it is not a weapon too? or was to amputate gangrenous members injured?

  7. #6

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    I'd be surprised if this was more than a pretty uniform accoutrement to be honest. I cannot see it being used to amputate anything. Imagine the hygiene issues for something like that, it is kept inside a relatively filthy scabbard the whole time full of particles and oil etc. Maybe it was used for that in individual circumstances but surely wasn't designed for it? I would not want anyone to amputate my member with one of these, gangrenous or otherwise

    I might be wrong but if I am I disagree with the practices of the DRK and will be writing a strongly worded feldpost

  8. #7

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    Quote by KradSpam View Post
    I'd be surprised if this was more than a pretty uniform accoutrement to be honest. I cannot see it being used to amputate anything. Imagine the hygiene issues for something like that, it is kept inside a relatively filthy scabbard the whole time full of particles and oil etc. Maybe it was used for that in individual circumstances but surely wasn't designed for it? I would not want anyone to amputate my member with one of these, gangrenous or otherwise

    I might be wrong but if I am I disagree with the practices of the DRK and will be writing a strongly worded feldpost
    but we must also consider that in the battlefield, in the midst of the fire, not much time to sterilize anything, perhaps to extract bullets, I do not know ... just curious why your teeth? or it will be to the same protection of medical personnel? it is well known that also fighting ...

  9. #8

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    As far as I know the DRK were never operating on the battlefield. Army medics would be the first on scene to any casualty. Operations would be in hospitals behind lines where there would be suitable equipment, after proper triage processes etc. Teeth are IMO just for symbolic decoration as well.

    Speculation admittedly, but it makes sense that way to me.

  10. #9
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    Here is a US Medical Corp bolo knife. It is more of a weapon than the DRC sidearm.
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  11. #10

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    These sidearms are outside of my areas of interests, but the topic did turn up in looking at some political (SA) daggers that were supposed to be connected to
    Carl Eduard Herzog von Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha, who was (among other things) the "Präsident des Deutschen Roten Kreuzes" circa 1936. 'Cutting to the chase': The DRK was more politically connected than you might think on the surface including being involved with some who had a connection to the KZ's, and even providing funds for the SS(?). With the sidearms themselves IMO just accessories to a uniform, and the saw teeth themselves possibly symbolic of the saw teeth on some bayonets that could also be used to cut splints, stretcher supports, etc. Not that I'm suggesting that they were used as functional tools in field/combat operations. With the blade tip (as was suggested) very likely a symbolic "de-militarization". Best Regards, Fred

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