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Modifications?

Article about: I recently came to inherit my grandfather's sword that he picked up during WWII. I've been doing quite a bit of research on it, but this is confusing me. As far as I know, he did not modify

  1. #1

    Default Modifications?

    I recently came to inherit my grandfather's sword that he picked up during WWII. I've been doing quite a bit of research on it, but this is confusing me. As far as I know, he did not modify the sword in any way nor do I believe he did as he picked it up for memorabilia. Pics:









    Sorry for the horrible quality, but it was the best I could do.

    So far, from what I can tell:
    The hilt up to the hand guard belongs to a shooting hirschfanger,
    The hand guard itself belongs to a hunting hirschfanger,
    The blade belongs to a shooting hirschfanger, and
    The scabbard belongs to a hunting hirschfanger.

    Do correct me if any of that is wrong, but the real question I have is: Why/who modded the sword like that? I can understand it probably didn't have a scabbard, so picking up the next one you could find that fits is only logical. But the hand guard? That, I don't get.

    Edit: Believed to be made by Carl Eickhorn due to the partially faded squirrel logo near the base of the blade.

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  3. #2

    Default Re: Modifications?

    The sword has not been modified, it's an Imperial Shooting Hirschfanger pre WW1 and was made like that. The brass looking fittings are actually tombak, an alloy. The scabbard I'm not sure of as the fittings were also tombak, but the one you show appears to be steel. Hope this helps.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

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