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RAD Fatman

Article about: Talking about German edged weapon collecting we must admit that there are some items on which opinions of collectors vary. It includes first model of railway dagger, Puma marine daggers, U9,

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    Default RAD Fatman

    Talking about German edged weapon collecting we must admit that there are some items on which opinions of collectors vary.

    It includes first model of railway dagger, Puma marine daggers, U9, Himmler and some other. Many of them are no longer considered to be separate models, for instance Luftwaffe 2 with a black grip are not distinguished as a separate type (for funeral procession). Other daggers have undergone many names (chaplain`s dagger, engineer`s, 1st model railway dagger or may be still a standard army dagger with a painted grip). One of such enigmatic daggers of obscure history that is widely debated is RAD Fatman.
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    Last edited by den70; 02-25-2016 at 05:31 PM.

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    This dagger was described for the first time by colonel Atwood and that played a nasty trick on it. Colonel Atwood`s imperfect reputation made many specialists to treat this dagger skeptically. Many considered that this dagger was assembled with original parts but was not an item of Third Reich period. Earlier communication between collectors as well as assessment of items was hampered by distance and low quality of images. For a long time this dagger was in a single pattern void of scabbard. But with the growing number of Third Reich edged weapon collectors, other items have appeared in different parts of the world. Some of them were bought up by dealers while others were bought from veterans` family members. Later the opponents of this model changed their mind first of all it refers to dealers who profited from a broaden range, as well as collectors. The dagger has a number of features inherent to this maker with a standard blade. But we`re far from a final conclusion as there are no documents left and for each argument “pro” there can be found “contra” argument.

    Pictures from F.J.Stephens
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    Such situation demands to choose this part or another. The dagger`s blade is unique in form and was produced only by Krebs. It`s a wide-spread misconception that it was informally named Fatman due to its blade thickness. This name was given due to a thick grip that was used in RAD daggers of this maker. In production of this dagger was used steel, it explains corrosion on some examples that have come to our times. It differs from a standard pattern by a motto on reverse. There is also a standard RAD stamp on reverse. The obverse has only a maker`s stamp. The blade`s shape resembles much a butcher`s knife. A groove near the base can help by blade sharpening if it is used as a punching tool. The blade steel is hard which could be helpful by work. If the dagger was not a decorative pattern as the majority of others, it could explain the location of the motto on the reverse. While working the owner could see the motto that had to inspire him. The thickness of the grip is identical for all early daggers of this maker. Unfortunately, images are not of great help to us in this respect as scabbards and dagger dimension are identical to a standard RAD dagger. We can`t also know were they actually used or due to blade difference they were left in stock where the winners took them as trophies. Nevertheless, among these daggers there is a period variety produced by Eickhorn with a full stag grip. That`s why the assumption of their variety stands true. I hope you can add my thread.
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    Interesting. I was never aware of this variation.
    Thanks

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    Thankyou Den for posting this rarely seen early variant ,,and your descriptive analysis. I am amazed at the continuing puzzle pieces that still seem to surface 80yrs later. Well done .

    Regards Larry
    It is not the size of a Collection in History that matters......Its the size of your Passion for it!! - Larry C

    One never knows what tree roots push to the surface of what laid buried before the tree was planted - Larry C

    “The farther back you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.” - Winston Churchill

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    My first RAD dagger was the fat man model. I bought it in 1960 for $8.00. This is years before Atwood started producing his parts and fantasy daggers. I have owned three and all were veteran acquired. In my opinion, there is no question this is a true prewar variation only made by Krebs. Those who have come to the party later can have their negative opinion on these but they are wrong
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

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    Glad to see this as I never found a answer to the one I had in the 80's Tom Johnson once told me he was skeptical of it as there were no period pictures of it bear in mind this was in the late 80;s when I was collecting daggers got rid of it as I did a lot of them and went in a different direction kind of wish I would have kept it as I have never seen another one till now. timothy

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    Bob, thanks for your opinions. Maybe do you post pictures your Fatman dagger? I think it will good for studies. Dagger from my collection good for me. But one subject difficult to judge. I agree with you they can produced in period. But we need more info from different sources.

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    Quote by den70 View Post
    Bob, thanks for your opinions. Maybe do you post pictures your Fatman dagger? I think it will good for studies. Dagger from my collection good for me. But one subject difficult to judge. I agree with you they can produced in period. But we need more info from different sources.
    55 years ago, collectors did not take detailed pictures of their items. That is a modern phenomena. There was so much material available with a limited buyer market, it was not unusual to rotate collection stock as a replacement could soon be found. I traded that dagger off many years ago.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

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    Thats for making this post, a first time for me, interesting article!

    Regards
    Ger

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