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Rough DRK Hewer

Article about: To clean or not to clean? I usually try not to mess with patina but in this case I might consider some efforts just to prevent the rust from spreading further. What do you gentlemen think? B

  1. #1
    Jan
    Jan is online now
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    Default Rough DRK Hewer

    To clean or not to clean? I usually try not to mess with patina but in this case I might consider some efforts just to prevent the rust from spreading further. What do you gentlemen think?

    Best, Jan
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  3. #2

    Default

    My advice would be clean it, you may be pleasantly surprised how well it turns out.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  4. #3

    Default

    NEAT PIECE!!!

    Take some Ballistol or equivelent, something that melts rust, and work it very gently with cloth, you'll be wiping much liquefied rust away. You can also use 000 or 0000 steel wool to get a little bit more aggressive with it.

    For the advanced tinkerer... you can also scrape rust off down to the bare metal (gently), using a tool with a very flat smooth surface like a putty knife, old butter knife, etc, in a way that does not scratch but leaves a very nice natural patina finish.

    All scraping and steel wooling applies to unpainted steel surfaces only. Alloy and painted surfaces have to be treated differently. The penetrating oil and cloth usually works wonders to rejuvenate.

  5. #4
    Jan
    Jan is online now
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    Default

    Thank You for your advice! Much appreciated! Does anyone have info on who designed this dagger and why the blade is serrated etc.

    Best, Jan

  6. #5

    Default

    I agree with what has been said above, will be great to see the outcome if you decide to clean it, Best Regards, Juan

  7. #6

    Default

    Check this link out

    WWII GERMAN DAGGERS PRICE GUIDE - MilitaryItems.com

    Quote by Jan View Post
    Thank You for your advice! Much appreciated! Does anyone have info on who designed this dagger and why the blade is serrated etc.

    Best, Jan

  8. #7

    Default

    Quote by Jan View Post
    Thank You for your advice! Much appreciated! Does anyone have info on who designed this dagger and why the blade is serrated etc.

    Best, Jan
    The blade is serrated for performing amputations in the field. The pommel is used as a sedative inducer. The scabbard is used as a tongue depressor.














    Probably.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  9. #8

    Default

    clean it.

  10. #9
    Jan
    Jan is online now
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    Default

    I will evaluate it when I have got in my hands (just paid for it). As for now I think a well planned clean is the only way of preserving the dagger for the future still retaining a lot of itīs patina and character which is part of the story of the piece too. All opinions are welcome.

    Best, Jan
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  11. #10

    Default

    Hhaaha Ned, you're too funny ;-))

    I figured it looks like a wood cutting sawback I have on a few knives, and although it would (maybe) saw bone, I researched it a little and this is the best place I happened onto;

    The DRK Hewer was authorised for daily wear in February 1938.

    It was 40 cm long and authorised for daily wear by Red Cross NCO’s and subordinates ranking from Helfer to Haupthelfer. The Hewer was mainly manufactured by Robert Klaas and P D Luneschloss.

    The Pommel had a flattened top and the cross guard had an oval space into which a Red Cross insignia was fixed. The insignia was an eagle with a swastika on its breast and spread wings. At the eagle’s feet was the International symbol of the Red Cross, a cross with equal extensions based upon points of the compass. The hilts are made of a cheep white metal base with a thin nickel plating of about 2 microns.

    The grips were made from two pieces of black Bakelite secured with 2 screws.

    The blade was wide with a saw tooth edge on one side that was used for removing plaster casts and preparing splints. The tip of the blade was squared off to conform to the Geneva Convention of medical staff not carrying offensive weapons.

    The scabbard was black, enamelled and fitted with nickel platted chape and locket. The Hewer was carried in a leather frog and secured by a clip on the scabbard.

    A silver coloured Portapee with blue threads on the crown, tied onto the black leather frog via the fabric strap, completed the accoutrements.

    The Hewer was issued from the stores when required, no personnel purchases were allowed.

    The Hewer was discontinued in 1940.
    Red Cross EM Hewer

    I think you'll find it looks way better in hand than in pics. Pics (good ones) tend to blow all little defects out of proportion. I don't think it needs much attention at all.

    Congrats one the find ;-)

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