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Éirí Amach na Cásca

Article about: Hope you dont mind Pat thought i would show the Easter Rising medal and 1917-1921 service medal ( black and tan ribbon) cheers rory

  1. #21

    Default Re: Éirí Amach na Cásca

    I thought I would bump my favorite thread with a famous speach made by Éamon de Valera, one of the leaders in the Rising, and the president of Ireland during the second world war.

    Eamon de Valera was one of the most significant figures in Irish politics in the 20th century. Arguably the most significant. He is also one of the most controversial figures. Many Irish people have fond memories of Dev, others...well, have not. However, whether you like him or not, surely all of us can salute him for this speech he gave on the 16th of May 1945 in response to an attack on Irish neutrality by Winston Churchill.

    On May 13th, Churchill said the following about the Irish position:

    "...and if it had not been for the loyalty and friendship of Northern Ireland we should have been forced to come to close quarters with Mr. de Valera or perish forever from the earth. However, with a restraint and poise to which, I say, history will find few parallels, we never laid a violent hand upon them, which at times would have been quite easy and quite natural, and left the de Valera Government to frolic with the German and later with the Japanese representatives to their heart's content."

    Considering Churchill would have been aware of the assistance Ireland had given despite its neutral stance, no doubt Churchill's remarks would have infuriated de Valera. But his speech in response was, I feel, a dignified masterpiece. I won't detail the beginning, though I urge you to read it all, but I will mention the latter parts of it:

    "It is indeed fortunate that Britain's necessity did not reach the point when Mr. Churchill would have acted. All credit to him that he successfully resisted the temptation which, I have not doubt, may times assailed him in his difficulties and to which I freely admit many leaders might have easily succumbed. It is indeed; hard for the strong to be just to the weak, but acting justly always has its rewards.

    By resisting his temptation in this instance, Mr. Churchill, instead of adding another horrid chapter to the already bloodstained record of the relations between England and this country, has advanced the cause of international morality an important step-one of the most important, indeed, that can be taken on the road to the establishment of any sure basis for peace.

    As far as the peoples of these two islands are concerned, it may, perhaps, mark a fresh beginning towards the realisation of that mutual comprehension to which Mr. Churchill has referred for which, I hope, he will not merely pray but work also, as did his predecessor who will yet, I believe, find the honoured place in British history which is due to him, as certainly he will find it in any fair record of the relations between Britain and ourselves.

    That Mr. Churchill should be irritated when our neutrality stood in the way of what he thought he vitally needed, I understand, but that he or any thinking person in Britain or elsewhere should fail to see the reason for our neutrality, I find it hard to conceive.

    I would like to put a hypothetical question-it is a question I have put to many Englishmen since the last war. Suppose Germany had won the war, had invaded and occupied England, and that after a long lapse of time and many bitter struggles, she was finally brought to acquiesce in admitting England's right to freedom, and let England go, but not the whole of England, all but, let us say, the six southern counties.

    These six southern counties, those, let us suppose, commanding the entrance to the narrow seas, Germany had singled out and insisted on holding herself with a view to weakening England as a whole, and maintaining the securing of her own communications through the Straits of Dover.

    Let us suppose further, that after all this had happened, Germany was engaged in a great war in which she could show that she was on the side of freedom of a number of small nations, would Mr. Churchill as an Englishman who believed that his own nation had as good a right to freedom as any other, not freedom for a part merely, but freedom for the whole-would he, whilst Germany still maintained the partition of his country and occupied six counties of it, would he lead this partitioned England to join with Germany in a crusade? I do not think Mr. Churchill would.

    Would he think the people of partitioned England an object of shame if they stood neutral in such circumstances? I do not think Mr. Churchill would.

    Mr. Churchill is proud of Britain's stand alone, after France had fallen and before America entered the War.

    Could he not find in his heart the generosity to acknowledge that there is a small nation that stood alone not for one year or two, but for several hundred years against aggression; that endured spoliation's, famines, massacres in endless succession; that was clubbed many times into insensibility, but that each time on returning consciousness took up the fight anew; a small nation that could never be got to accept defeat and has never surrendered her soul?

    Mr. Churchill is justly proud of his nation's perseverance against heavy odds. But we in this island are still prouder of our people's perseverance for freedom through all the centuries. We, of our time, have played our part in the perseverance, and we have pledged our selves to the dead generations who have preserved intact for us this glorious heritage, that we, too, will strive to be faithful to the end, and pass on this tradition unblemished.

    Many a time in the past there appeared little hope except that hope to which Mr. Churchill referred, that by standing fast a time would come when, to quote his own words: "…the tyrant would make some ghastly mistake which would alter the whole balance of the struggle."

    I sincerely trust, however, that it is not thus our ultimate unity and freedom will be achieved, though as a younger man I confess I prayed even for that, and indeed at times saw not other.

    In latter years, I have had a vision of a nobler and better ending, better for both our people and for the future of mankind. For that I have now been long working. I regret that it is not to this nobler purpose that Mr. Churchill is lending his hand rather than, by the abuse of a people who have done him no wrong, trying to find in a crisis like the present excuse for continuing the injustice of the mutilation of our country.

    I sincerely hope that Mr. Churchill has not deliberately chosen the latter course but, if he has, however regretfully we may say it, we can only say, be it so.

    Meanwhile, even as a partitioned small nation, we shall go on and strive to play our part in the world continuing unswervingly to work for the cause of true freedom and for peace and understanding."


    Best regards, Patrick

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Éirí Amach na Cásca

    Isn't this the same guy who offered his condolances to ther German Embassy in Dublin on the Death of Adolf Hitler !!!!
    Last edited by Paul D; 05-26-2012 at 01:22 AM.
    The gates of hell were opened and we accepted the invitation to enter" 26/880 Lance Sgt, Edward Dyke. 26th Bn Northumberland Fusiliers , ( 3rd Tyneside Irish )

    1st July 1916

    Thought shall be the harder , heart the keener,
    Courage the greater as our strength faileth.
    Here lies our leader ,in the dust of his greatness.
    Who leaves him now , be damned forever.
    We who are old now shall not leave this Battle,
    But lie at his feet , in the dust with our leader

    House Carles at the Battle of Hastings

  3. #23

    Default Re: Éirí Amach na Cásca

    Quote by Paul E View Post
    Isn't this the same guy who offered his condolances to ther German Embassy in Dublin on the Death of Adold Hitler !!!!
    Yes it was, I think he saw it was the thing to do as part of his neutrality stance but it is now quite clear that it was bad judgement,I dont think he was an admirer or supporter of AH or Germany but he is an historicial figure who is the subject of hot retrospective debate in Ireland, BTW it is sometimes forgotten that he also offered his condolences to the USA on the death of Roosevelt.

  4. #24

    Default Re: Éirí Amach na Cásca

    Quote by renmore View Post
    Yes it was, I think he saw it was the thing to do as part of his neutrality stance but it is now quite clear that it was bad judgement,I dont think he was an admirer or supporter of AH or Germany but he is an historicial figure who is the subject of hot retrospective debate in Ireland, BTW it is sometimes forgotten that he also offered his condolences to the USA on the death of Roosevelt.
    Well he would wouldn't he....considering he was born in New York? And as Paul said, he offered his condolences to Nazi Germany on the death of Adolf Hitler, the ONLY world leader to do so.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  5. #25

    Default Re: Éirí Amach na Cásca

    Here is Michael Collins Pistol, Sword and the pen used to sign the treaty & his death warrant ;

    Collins_Barracks02.jpg

    And Collins Barracks ;

    Collins_Barracks01.jpg

    Cheers, Patrick

  6. #26

    Default Re: Éirí Amach na Cásca

    Quote by big ned View Post
    Well he would wouldn't he....considering he was born in New York? And as Paul said, he offered his condolences to Nazi Germany on the death of Adolf Hitler, the ONLY world leader to do so.
    The very fact that he was born in NY saved him from being executed in 1916 by the British, but it had NOTHING to do with offering condolences on the death of Roosevelt, that deed was merely another act in his facade of maintaining neutrality.
    Last edited by renmore; 05-26-2012 at 02:23 PM.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Éirí Amach na Cásca

    Hi all, while on this subject thought i would mention arthur smith 4th hussars KIA during the rebellion, taken in trinity college at the spot where he died and was buried, 1st pic is original memorial, was getting on a bit and was also defaced, 2nd pic is new memorial, 3rd pic is his last resting place in grangegorman military cemetary. thanks Willie
    Attached Images Attached Images

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