Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Results 1 to 9 of 9

"Honor and Sacrifice"

Article about: CGM logo-650w.jpg Press release info: Nearly seven decades after the beginning of World War II, the Congressional Gold Medal - the nation's highest civilian award - was bestowed collectively

  1. #1

    Default "Honor and Sacrifice"

    CGM logo-650w.jpg

    Press release info:

    Nearly seven decades after the beginning of World War II, the Congressional Gold Medal - the nation's highest civilian award - was bestowed collectively on the U.S. Army's 100th Infantry Battalion, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and the Military Intelligence Service for their extraordinary accomplishments in the war. The men in these units, comprised almost entirely of persons of Japanese ancestry, fought with bravery and valor against America's enemies on the battlefields in Europe and Asia, even while many of their parents and other family members were held in internment camps.


    Holocaust Museum Houston today Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

    Honor and Sacrifice-300w.jpg


    "Honor and Sacrifice" tells the complex story of a Japanese immigrant family ripped apart by World War II. The Matsumoto family included five sons; two who fought for the Americans and three who fought for the Japanese. The eldest, Hiroshi (Roy), became a hero, fighting against the Japanese with Merrill's Marauders, an American guerrilla unit in Burma. He was born near Los Angeles, educated in Japan and became a hero when he used his Japanese language skills and military training to save his surrounded, starving battalion deep in the Burmese jungle. At the same time, his parents and sisters were living in their family's ancestral home, Hiroshima. The story is told by Roy's daughter Karen as she discovers her father's work in military intelligence, kept secret for 50 years. Ann Takehara and Marion and Kenneth Takehara will lead a post-film discussion at the Holocuast Museum Houston.
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  2. #2

    Default

    The book sounds very interesting and will be a must buy. A friend of mine who was kibei, an American born Japanese and educated in Japan, worked for the U S Government during the war as an intellegence analyst. Many Japanese Americans in his California community felt he took the job to avoid being sent to an internment camp and the resentment carried through in the post war years. As many Japanese Americans had relatives in Japan, this must have been a very difficult period for them.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  3. #3

    Default

    Sounds like a good basis for an interesting film!..
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  4. #4

    Default

    Guys it is a film ... although the press info doesn't make it clear.

    Honor & Sacrifice - Home

    Vimeo film teaser:

    Honor & Sacrifice - Tease on Vimeo
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  5. #5

    Default

    Cool, that's another one to watch!..
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote by Gunny Hartmann View Post
    Cool, that's another one to watch!..
    you dont have time now paul,your to busy bashing Air Raid Shelters
    With Regards Jake.

  7. #7
    ?

    Default

    I would love to read the book and see a movie based on it.

  8. #8

    Default

    The 442nd RCT got a major publicity shot in the movie Go For Broke (1951) which is about the 442nd RCT in WWII, and though it drew on big name Hollywood actors, i. e. Van Johnson, it also used former 442nd RCT members including Lane Nakano, Henry Nakamura, George Miki, Akira Fukunaga, Ken Okamoto, Harry Hamada, and Henry Nakamura plus several others who were not credited. The film was written and directed by Robert Pirosh. Though it was a Hollywood production, it wasn't a bad film and did an excellent job of portraying the 442nd and its soldiers as first rate Americans and combat infantrymen. It is still available. Dwight

  9. #9

    Default

    I'd like to mention that the 442nd RCT was the highest decorated unit in the US Army in WWII...
    cheers, Glenn

Similar Threads

  1. " Pattern " SS Honor Dagger Scabbard

    In SS Dienstdolch, 1933 & 1936
    05-17-2012, 11:01 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •