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i need help with these items

Article about: foto0103.jpgfoto0104.jpgfoto0105.jpgfoto0106.jpgfoto0107.jpg

  1. #11

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    Since everyone's been so paranoid about it, perhaps someone should try potato bug warfare. Might work.
    "Only a real risk tests the reality of a belief." - C.S. Lewis

  2. #12
    ?

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    Quote by avenger View Post
    Since everyone's been so paranoid about it, perhaps someone should try potato bug warfare. Might work.
    I think there were real plans to drop them during the war! It probably never happened, but if it did, we might not know about it anyway, since something like that might be covered up even today.

  3. #13

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    Indeed, Erno...Here is an East German poster accusing the US of air-dropping the bugs in order to destroy the crop...
    cheers, Glenn
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #14

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    Glenn, that is awesome.

    Well, now I'm jealous of this guys little document. I'm glad he showed it to us!
    "Only a real risk tests the reality of a belief." - C.S. Lewis

  5. #15

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    Lice were a far worse problem for folks back then...I've heard the most awful stories of the Lice-Plague from both world wars, and have two "Delousing Papers" in my collection, confirming that the man is "Free of all vermin"...
    cheers, Glenn

  6. #16

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    The German, and later Soviet propaganda stating America was responsible for air dropping potato beetles as a form of biological warfare probably stems from the fact that the beetle itself actually originated in the States, it was discovered in the 1830's in the Rocky mountain range of Colorado, and is commonly known as the Colorado beetle. It is widespread in Europe today, but thankfully has, much like rabies, not got a foothold in the U.K. There are posters warning people to be vigilant and aware of bringing it into this country by accident at all airports, and especially rural Police stations, libraries and other public buildings. The problem with the insect is that it is becoming increasingly immune to the various pesticides used in the past to control it, it became immune to DDT back in the 50's. So far, the U.K. has remained free of this plague.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  7. #17

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    Quote by avenger View Post
    Since everyone's been so paranoid about it, perhaps someone should try potato bug warfare. Might work.
    Bug warfare is no laughing matter.

    I learned that from Starship Troopers.

  8. #18

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    ...But seriously. That legal document refers to a Verordnung [act] of 22nd April 1941, published in the Reichsgesetzblatt (RGBl.) [National Law Gazette] I, page 227.

    I have looked that one up. It is the Neunte Verordnung zur Abwehr des Kartoffelkäfers vom 22. April 1941 [Ninth act on the defense against the potato beetle of 22nd April 1941]. In 11 paragraphs grouped into 4 sections, that act legally regulates the official measures against this pest.

    Of interest here is § 10, which deals with the consequences of breaking the rules of the act:

    Deliberate violations could be punished by up to two years of jail and/or a fine; negligent violations could be punished by a fine of up to 150 Reichsmark and/or arrest.

  9. #19

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    you guys are amazed with those documents i have more photos to post of more documents from the gestapo office in lisbon walter schellenberg trained our portuguese fascist police pide dgs and we in portugal have a lot of 3º reich documents im going to post more

  10. #20

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    Quote by bigmacglenn1966 View Post
    It is indeed a serious translation, friend...Collecting these harmful bugs was a community effort, as the potato was/is the staple food in the German diet...These collections went on well into the 1950s, as Europe/Germany was recovering...I recall one of my German Teachers telling me that during the war the rumor went around that the Allies were dropping Potato-bugs from the sky to damage the crop...By the way, in WWI, the French blamed the Germans for the same thing...
    cheers, Glenn

    - - ------- - -
    Lol - the Doctor likely thought he was 'above' collecting
    these insect pests.........
    Regards,


    Steve.

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