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My first Wakizashi from Edo period 1600 to 1700

Article about: hello fellas i resently told some people that i could obtain a verry nice whakizashi from a fellow collector of japanese items and i bought it look at this beauty and give your opinions chee

  1. #11
    ?

    Default Re: My first Wakizashi from Edo period 1600 to 1700

    That`s a cracking looking sword jacob , in lovely condition and super fittings , i look forward to seeing the tanto

    cheers Al

  2. #12

    Default Re: My first Wakizashi from Edo period 1600 to 1700

    Quote by ALLERBERGER View Post
    That`s a cracking looking sword jacob , in lovely condition and super fittings , i look forward to seeing the tanto

    cheers Al
    hi all

    maybe rude to ask but what did you payed for your sword
    as it is in perfect polish [or did you send it to japan for a repolish ]

    cheers j

  3. #13

    Default Re: My first Wakizashi from Edo period 1600 to 1700

    Jakob-
    There are two major groups that issue origami or certificates on Japanese swords. The larger of the two is the Nippon Bijitsu Token Hozon Kyokai. This organization was founded shortly after WW2 to preserve and save the Japanese sword. They have offices and museum storage in Tokyo. The second organization is Nihon Token Hozon Kai, which was founded in the late 19th century. Unfortunately, after the death of the organization's head, Yoshikawa Kentaro, the group split in to two factions. Both groups have at times traveled outside of Japan to conduct shinsa or judging. The organizations are known as the NBTHK and the NTHK. The NBTHK only conducts shinsa at it's headquarters to control the accuracy of the papers they issue. Papers are also only issued to members. Membership is around $225 annually which includes a monthly journal in Japanese.
    Both organizations conduct shinsa quarterly in Tokyo. To send a sword to Japan, you would have to hire the services of an agent to clear your sword past customs. All true Japanese swords kept in Japan by law must be registered. This process alone will cost you a minimum of $600. The agent will then take your sword for shinsa and obtain an export license for your sword and return it. If the blade obtains a paper, that will follow in several months as all are in hand written caligraphy. The process will cost a minimum of $1000.
    The catch for you is the expense will likely far exceed the value of the sword(unless you obtained it for nothing or close to nothing). Further, unsigned Shinto or Shinshinto papers are just an educated guess. You could submit this blade ten times and receive ten different opinions. The problem being that contract swords such as yours were produced by students of the master swordsmith under his supervision. It was a part of the apprenticeship.
    I would suggest you enjoy your sword for what it is, which is a very nice example of a short sword worn by a mid level samurai and made in the mid to late Edo Period. If you wish to send your blade for shinsa, I will be happy to point you in the direction of a competent representative.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  4. #14

    Default Re: My first Wakizashi from Edo period 1600 to 1700

    holly crapper {sorry} thats quite expensif i didnt know that
    thanks for the explenation

    i did bought this wak you may know it for 900euro
    as it is a verry nice starters waki

    here in the netherlands we have the dutch token club
    maybe i`ll take it to them for a closer examanation

    cheers j

  5. #15

    Default Re: My first Wakizashi from Edo period 1600 to 1700

    Jakob-
    Your sword was purchased at a reasonable price.
    Yes, you have a competent sword study group in the Netherlands. The founder was a well respected student of the study of Japanese swords. I am sure you will find some one competent to teach you about these things. Study of the Japanese sword is a life long pursuit. Even the most respected scholars in Japan at times disagree-especially with unsigned older blades. In your country, many swords were brought from Japan during and after the feudal period due to the relations of trade. Possibly some day you can find a long forgotten treasure brought to your country by a Dutch seaman or trader.
    May I caution you at first to listen and learn. Take care not to fall under the guidance of a false prophet. There is a certain madness that comes with collecting Japanese swords. Too many collectors wish to attain the title of sensei or teacher. Those who talk the most are the ones to avoid. True teachers are in most cases quite reserved and quiet. Good luck in your study and the hunt!
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  6. #16

    Default Re: My first Wakizashi from Edo period 1600 to 1700

    domo arigato bob

    i`ll go and take a look at there website and see when there next meeting is and well go and have a look

    cheers jacob

  7. #17

    Default Re: My first Wakizashi from Edo period 1600 to 1700

    hi

    thought lets upload a better picture of the hamon

    cheers jacob
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