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Older people dont talk about it

Article about: i was at the market two sundays ago and i bought a ww2 book. as i was walking out i stoped to get some veg from a stall. a old man was standing next to me he said do you like do read this st

  1. #21


    i was at the market two sundays ago and i bought a ww2 book.
    as i was walking out i stoped to get some veg from a stall. a old man was standing next to me he said do you like do read this stuff i said yea more like look at the images.
    he said he has got a few books at home. but told me how he served in korea in a australian infantry unit. well a hour and half later and about 30 missed calls from the other half. he told me a lot. and some real gruesome stuff too. must be very hard to try to put those types of things away in the mind.
    ive meet a some veitnam vets too when ive beed out about and realy like to talk to these guys too. i went back to a veitnam vet house for a brew not so long ago.
    a mate of mine grandpar is still going strong in his mid 90s he was a tank driver in the british amy ww2. he would tell us a lot when we were kids. but one quiston i remmber asking him, as kid was, what would he do if there was any wounded enemy in his path.
    he said well if we stopped, there 88s would take us out and if he had gone of the side of the road he would hit a mine. so he said if could he would go around. but then he said you wouldent here anything anyway from the noise of the tank. but the he smiled and said if they were ss he would go faster. he has only just told my mate that he has had the same nightmare everynight since the war and it has never gone away. and told him what it was. i think the wounds of war are somthing some may tell but a lot will never tell. i have the utmost respect for all that have served and still are sirving.

  2. #22


    With regards to meeting people that are willing to stop and talk, it really is about luck. Some will never cross paths with a veteran who has the urge to share his or her stories, yet others will have more joy. Personally, I consider myself very fortunate in that many have openly shared - and still do, their tales of the time. We must remember to be respectful and also to appreciate any time we have with these veterans - for none of us last forever. Indeed, only yesterday Rochus Misch passed away aged 96. He famously shared his experiences with countless people over many, many years, and now, he has gone. When you do get the opportunity, cherish it.


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  3. #23
    ian is offline


    the inability for what ever reason of the old people to talk about things ,is understandable , having been through the fight my self ,details are the main thing i find no one wants to talk about , untill the middle 70s my mother was alowed to keep her luger ,for self defence ,against what ?? i never realy found out ,but it had to do with the murder of an hungarian princes in london ,, she allways,, my mother allways said she new who did it
    she said it was the princeses lover ,,a german officer in the ss ,, but she would never ever give any details ,, it was like trying to get blood out of a stone ,, my mother passed and took the knowlage with her ,,i believe that the british authoraies know , but naver had aney evidence ,,to maney years have gone now and no one cares any more ,, i have told of this before on this forum ,mabe some times ,secrets are better cept secret ??

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