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WW2 veteran numbers dwindling

Article about: Just read a sobering statistic, the number of surviving Australian WW2 veterans is now so small that they could fit into the MCG with room to spare. We are losing them at an alarming rate, a

  1. #1

    Default WW2 veteran numbers dwindling

    Just read a sobering statistic, the number of surviving Australian WW2 veterans is now so small that they could fit into the MCG with room to spare. We are losing them at an alarming rate, apparently around 300 a week.

    Lest We Forget.

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    You so right. I m close to most of the WW2 vets in my area. I went the other day to talk with one(Mr. Kirkland) 6th Marine Div. Veteran of 3 inland invasions wounded 3 times, My friend Had pasted away while I was out of town on buss. A very Godly man who loved his family and I was honored to have known him. Marty

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    I grew up and spent my formative years among those men in an American Legion Post in Queens, NY during the 1960'a and 70's. I have many fond memories of my dad, his fellow WWII veterans, and friends. I remember back then there were still WWI veterans among the membership as well as Korean war vets. They were always trying to recruit Vietnam vets, and give them the welcome home they deserved. I knew so many colorful characters, what a great group of guys.

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    Yes, I knew loads of WW2 veterans, many of them were relatives and friends of my parents. It's sad seeing them all disappearing. I also knew WW1 blokes and they are all gone now. All we can do is keep their memory alive, my daughter is too young to understand but hopefully some day she'll come to appreciate why her dad makes such a big deal about having her meet and speak to these old blokes now while we still have some of them with us. One day she'll be able to tell her own kids that she met and spoke to WW2 veterans in the same way I tell her about how I met and spoke to WW1 veterans.

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    I grew up in Germany in the 70s-80s, and was practically raised by the "Kriegs-Generation"...My Grandparents and their friends, several teachers, my classmates' parents, the neighbors, my mother's employer...they all had a story to tell...As a kid I would often engage them in conversation about their experiences and I still have all their stories in my head...I really should put them down somewhere for posterity...I read somewhere that in the US, WWII Vets are leaving us at a rate of 1000 per day...
    cheers, Glenn
    Last edited by bigmacglenn; 06-13-2015 at 05:10 PM.

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    Quote by relicz View Post
    I grew up and spent my formative years among those men in an American Legion Post in Queens, NY during the 1960'a and 70's. I have many fond memories of my dad, his fellow WWII veterans, and friends. I remember back then there were still WWI veterans among the membership as well as Korean war vets. They were always trying to recruit Vietnam vets, and give them the welcome home they deserved. I knew so many colorful characters, what a great group of guys.
    Your Dad's American Legion Post waws unusual. The national attitude of the American Legion at the time was they did not want Viet Nam vets because they were losers. This attitude has left them wanting for Viet Nam vets today as we have not forgotten. They are on the not do list somewhere under Jane Fonda.
    Time marches on and generation by generation pass in to history. Every year, the small town near where I leve would have a Veteran's Day lunch to honor their WW2 vets. When I started going to them, there were over two dozen. Last year, there were only three left. They are now taking in all vets to fill the void.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

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    As a "baby boomer" . born in 1949, I was surrounded by WWII vets, including my father, uncles, and many family friends. They are, unsurprisingly, virtually all gone, including my father, a USAAF veteran, who passed away last December.
    Too late, but I wish I had spoken more in depth with many of them over the years, when they were still hale & hearty, although I did hear my share of war stories.
    May they all rest in peace; they deserve it.

    BobS

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    Good Point, Bob...The Legion/VFW blew it years ago with their attitude towards Vietnam Era Vets...This attitude was extended to Cold War Era Vets as well...I served in the 80s and when I lived in small-town Tilton, New Hampshire in 1987-88 and went to the Veteran's Post I was more or less told that my generation wasn't eligible for membership...
    cheers, Glenn

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    Only 150 British vets in Normandy this year for D Day 71 !!
    The gates of hell were opened and we accepted the invitation to enter" 26/880 Lance Sgt, Edward Dyke. 26th Bn Northumberland Fusiliers , ( 3rd Tyneside Irish )

    1st July 1916

    Thought shall be the harder , heart the keener,
    Courage the greater as our strength faileth.
    Here lies our leader ,in the dust of his greatness.
    Who leaves him now , be damned forever.
    We who are old now shall not leave this Battle,
    But lie at his feet , in the dust with our leader

    House Carles at the Battle of Hastings

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    Quote by BOB COLEMAN View Post
    Your Dad's American Legion Post waws unusual. The national attitude of the American Legion at the time was they did not want Viet Nam vets because they were losers. This attitude has left them wanting for Viet Nam vets today as we have not forgotten. They are on the not do list somewhere under Jane Fonda.
    Time marches on and generation by generation pass in to history. Every year, the small town near where I leve would have a Veteran's Day lunch to honor their WW2 vets. When I started going to them, there were over two dozen. Last year, there were only three left. They are now taking in all vets to fill the void.
    I never saw that in Post #118 in Woodhaven Queens. Quite the opposite. My oldest brother was a Vietnam vet, I say was because I lost him a week ago and and still reeling from it. My dad held multiple posts over the years from commander, adjutant, ect. I remember as a kid, he would go out a few times a month with the color guard to someone funeral upon their posthumous return home. I was recently contacted by a Vietnam veteran my dad recruited to join the post. He had a memorial paving stone dedicated to my and granddad (WWI) installed at the rededicated veterans memorial in Bayville, NY. I thought that was very decent of him. My dad and his peers felt the Vietnam veteran was the future of the American Legion and who would carry it on after they were gone. It was a difficult task, because of the lack of a welcome home they received by American society as a whole, many guys just wanted to hide their service. More's the pity.

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