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1827 British VR volunteer rifle sword

Article about: I bought this sword a while ago and it has an engraving on the spine, can anyone help id it or what it stands for? It is a C followed by a bursting arrow and a P

  1. #1
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    Default 1827 British VR volunteer rifle sword

    I bought this sword a while ago and it has an engraving on the spine, can anyone help id it or what it stands for?
    It is a C followed by a bursting arrow and a PClick image for larger version. 

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  2. #2

    Default Re: 1827 British VR volunteer rifle sword

    'CP' is the 'Center of Percussion' area of the blade. When used in a chopping blow,
    the blade is most effective at this point. In other words, it's the sweet spot........!
    Regards,


    Steve.

  3. #3
    ?

    Default Re: 1827 British VR volunteer rifle sword

    Thanks a lot Steve, makes sense, it makes it the only sweet spot I would not want to feel!

    Brent

  4. #4

    Default Re: 1827 British VR volunteer rifle sword

    The etching around the disc is interesting because there is a resemblance to this one. Is there a maker's name? FP
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  5. #5
    ?

    Default Re: 1827 British VR volunteer rifle sword

    No, the only markings are on the sweet spot. Looks like the same symbol...

    Brent

  6. #6

    Default Re: 1827 British VR volunteer rifle sword

    Brent,

    It is what it is, but I was sorry to hear that there is no maker's logo that can be seen. The etched "surround" (for lack of a better term) varied quite a bit even by the same maker depending on the time frame. And there was a certain amount of copying going on by various makers in an effort to 'upgrade' their products in the eyes of potential customers (like the offshore "knockoff" watches with close but not exact trademarks). With the unique to the maker proof discs often being the key as to who made what if the etching is too worn to read. But unfortunately, while I've think that I've seen it before. With the Rifle Officer's sword I don't think that I have a confirmed record of who used that proof disc marking.

    Best Regards, FP

  7. #7

    Default Re: 1827 British VR volunteer rifle sword

    Similar to what Frogprince says, I've read that these 'proof marks' were often
    put on blades by lesser manufacturers to make their swords appear
    high-grade, when they may have been inferior to more well
    known 'brand name quality' bladesmith's, such as
    Wilkinson, Firmin, etc..............


    A great book on the subject is 'Swords of the British Army'
    by Brian Robson.
    Regards,


    Steve.

  8. #8

    Default Re: 1827 British VR volunteer rifle sword

    Robson’s book is an excellent reference, with another one that I like being the earlier “British Military Swords” by John Wilkinson Latham. Whose family had a long history with Wilkinson, with John Latham being the personal assistant of Henry Wilkinson. In the book it states that in 1854 Henry Wilkinson introduced various tests, and that either he or John Latham personally tested the swords and installed the brass (proof mark) discs in the blades. And that sooner or later everyone was using the (proof mark) discs - with an aside that he doubted that other makers did the same kind of rigorous tests as Wilkinson.

    Before they discontinued using the discs completely in the later part of the 20th, I can see what looks like some tarnishing/verdigris seen with later 19th century examples made by Wlkinson. But I might take a minor exception as to the earliest (proof mark) discs used being brass. That’s because I can see absolutely no signs of tarnishing - which suggests to me either solid gold. Or a very heavy layer of gold that was able to withstand the stamping process.

    Best Regards to All, Fred

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