Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 38

Forget about Ka-Bar. Cattaraugus 225 Q all the way.

Article about: Thanks, Steve. Very swift reaction it was too. Appreciate it. In regards to rynegolds post: I found it an interesting read. Not only because there were some interesting info, but also becaus

  1. #21
    ?

    Default Re: Forget about Ka-Bar. Cattaraugus 225 Q all the way.

    Thanks, Steve.
    Very swift reaction it was too. Appreciate it.

    In regards to rynegolds post:
    I found it an interesting read. Not only because there were some interesting info, but also because it supported some of my theories about the 225Q.
    That the Cattaraugus was not meant specifically as a Quartermaster knife does how ever not change the fact, that it is known as such in wide circles.
    Like Walkwolf says, its the case for the 225Q to be known by many as the 'Quartermaster,' just as the Ka-Bar has become the generic name for knives of that type
    BTW many confuse the Cattaraugus for a Ka-Bar.
    Generic names are often used in other fields too regardless of the name of the product used: its the case for copies....or was (Xerox this, Xerox that) etc etc.

  2. #22

    Default

    The civi model of this Cattaraugus Cutlery Company knife was the 2550 I believe (It had Walnut spacers mixed with the compressed leather handle rings which the Q does not) and the Q in the 225Q is for Quartermaster Corps contract. If this knife was a "Quartermaster" issue only then the production run of over 1 000 000 pieces was grossly excessive. There is photographic evidence of US servicemen from US Army Infantry Generals (who I fell would not wish to carry a stereotyped "create opener" on his belt) to Black American service troops wearing them. A true general purpose edged weapon/tool used by many varied US Army personnel I would think.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	post-70-1240910266[1].jpg 
Views:	158 
Size:	90.7 KB 
ID:	605044Name:  edlin-294x389[1].jpg
Views: 503
Size:  16.0 KBClick image for larger version. 

Name:	post-70-1250637664[1].jpg 
Views:	121 
Size:	125.7 KB 
ID:	605046Name:  imagesWC1ZVETA.jpg
Views: 338
Size:  11.0 KBName:  Cattaraugus 225q 1.jpg
Views: 384
Size:  7.3 KB

    And a few creates to open for this full bird Colonel.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	post-70-1250636589[1].jpg 
Views:	100 
Size:	63.1 KB 
ID:	605050

    And this is possibly why some 225Q's are being advertised for sale as "commando"/Special Forces knives etc.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	post-68-1175726585[1].jpg 
Views:	132 
Size:	65.4 KB 
ID:	605054Name:  imagesOIXBCNL9.jpg
Views: 345
Size:  11.4 KB

    These are much under rated WW2 issued knives IMO. Nice pick up Scout.

    All the best
    Dave
    Last edited by Thanatos; 12-04-2013 at 10:51 AM. Reason: Added images and text

  3. #23
    ?

    Default

    Great knife info and pics - thanks
    Indeed one of the most underrated WWII knives out there.
    The 225 mentioned here is still one of my favourite knives....it just feels right somehow.

  4. #24

    Default

    The need for fighting/utility knives was great during WWII
    and it kept most American cutlery companies very busy.

    Proof of this is the fact that today you can still find WWII
    era knives in their original packaging or in unissued
    condition. After the war, as demand fell off, a lot
    of the smaller businesses and/or their equipment
    and tooling were bought out by larger,
    more established concerns.........
    Regards,


    Steve.

  5. #25
    ?

    Default

    Agreed.
    The huge demand for knives during WWII can also be seen in the diversity of knife models/shapes.

  6. #26

    Default

    Here's my single example,

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	US Cattaraugus 225Q 1.jpg 
Views:	160 
Size:	321.5 KB 
ID:	605370Click image for larger version. 

Name:	US Cattaraugus 225Q 2.jpg 
Views:	173 
Size:	299.3 KB 
ID:	605371Click image for larger version. 

Name:	US Cattaraugus 225Q 3.jpg 
Views:	102 
Size:	259.2 KB 
ID:	605373

    The grooves in the middle of the leather handle are factory cut for grip and all good examples should have them or evidence of them.

    I think their a nice solid well made GP knife with an interesting history.

    Another image that I missed last night

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	post-70-1250637537[1].jpg 
Views:	66 
Size:	129.7 KB 
ID:	605388

    All the best gents
    Dave

  7. #27
    ?

    Default

    A good condition example of the 225Q as well.

    Thanks for posting

  8. #28
    ?

    Default

    I have a couple of those. The first one I acquired as a teenager and put it through its paces in the woods. Didn't find out it was a military knife until many years later.

    They are an incredibly robust knife that holds an edge very well. Always like them!

  9. #29
    ?

    Default

    It was made as a user, so using the old warhorse is fine in my book.

    Besides, its not like they are scarce.

    How ever, the steel is a little soft in comparison to more modern steel types.

    It will still work fine though.

    What was your impression of it in use - blade shape usefulness, sharpening etc?

  10. #30
    ?

    Default

    I used to chop down 1 1/2 to 2 inch saplings and limb them to make walking sticks when hiking. A few angled swings at the base of the sapling and it was done.

    There was an old knife sharpener that used to have a push cart with a couple of sharpening and polishing wheels that he walked through the neighborhood streets of NYC. He had a long white beard and looked relatively ancient to me as an adolescent in the 1970's. I have never seen anyone, man or machine, that could put a better edge on a bladed weapon or tool. He was absolutely gifted at his craft.
    Last edited by relicz; 12-06-2013 at 06:01 AM.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Lest we Forget

    In Discussions
    11-12-2010, 08:08 PM
  2. Lest We Forget

    In Doc's, paper items, photos, propaganda
    01-03-2010, 11:37 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •