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Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

Article about: I too have searched the net for "Horstmann" and come up with a few swords by this maker - mostly plain Civil War Officers' swords. Apparent history from one site states the company

  1. #11

    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    I too have searched the net for "Horstmann" and come up with a few
    swords by this maker - mostly plain Civil War Officers' swords.
    Apparent history from one site states the company was quite large and
    did import sword blades from Solingen Germany, as well as being
    manufacturers of many sorts of military uniforms, acoutrements
    etc. from 1815 to late in the 1900's at the very least.

    I have examined only a couple of swords with the same type of "floral"
    hilt and grip style, and I was told both times they were US Civil War period
    and French in origin.

    It is entirely possible they were like this one but with plain blades or
    severely over-cleaned as there was no maker or engraving on them.





    Regards,





    Steve.

  2. #12
    ?

    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    I think they are pretty rare, The only site with a picture of one is this one. Mine. Have any idea on the maker mark? MAU?

  3. #13
    ?

    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    Saho.
    the sword is a USMC NCO sword. the sword was instituted in 1859, the design based on the 1850 army sword. and would have a cast brass hilt. not to be confused with the USMC officers sword, the mameluke sword, persian design with a white handle. on the NCO sword they started etching the blades in 1875. and were a wider blade untill 1918.
    the mameluke was removed from service from 1859 to 1875, during that time the USMC officers used the same model as the NCO but with gold gilt fittings instead of brass.
    but back to your sword. i'd guess that it is made after 1918 because of the narrower style blade. this style is still used today. i hope this helps some.
    andrew

  4. #14
    ?

    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    Just to clear up about the Star of David. I miss quoted but this is what a Mr.Wilkinson- Latham had to say about the use of the star on Wilkinson blades

    Post # 57
    http://www.swordforum.com/forums/sho...d+stamp&page=3

  5. #15
    ?

    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    I am not sure I understand what I read. Is this a Wilkinson blade?

    "The Wilkinson double triangle that surrounded the Proof mark first made it's appearance in 1844.

    It has been discussed and dissected over the years and various explanations given from Star of David to other fanciful explanations.

    It was in fact what it was - a double triangle. The triangle is the strongest geometric shape so double that to emphasise Henry Wilkinson 'brutal' blade testing machine built in 1844 and mentioned in the 1st Edition of Observations on Swords."
    Robert Wilkinson-Latham

    What do you think? I have the double triangle on both sides of the blade.

  6. #16
    ?

    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    No its not a Wilkinson. In another thread he mentions how other Mfg's used the star for the same reason as Wilkinson's.
    Wilkinson's Swords will have a Brass proof plug in the ricasso area.

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