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Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

Article about: I too have searched the net for "Horstmann" and come up with a few swords by this maker - mostly plain Civil War Officers' swords. Apparent history from one site states the company

  1. #1
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    Default Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    I have a Marine NCO sword my Dad gave to me a while back, I am on a quest to find out more about it. I do not understand the star of David on it?? When was this made and where can I find a scabbard for it?

    Brent
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    I am No expert!
    I'm not sure about the Maker's mark.The Horstmann's that I looked at had just the name stamped in the blade.
    As far as the Star of David goes... ITS NOT!!!
    This is a quote from Mr Richard Wilkinson Latham on SFI.
    The triangle has been known/used as a sign of strenth. So to put 2 triangles on the blade Mean's "Its twice as strong"

  3. #3

    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    Quote by AZPhil View Post
    I am No expert!
    I'm not sure about the Maker's mark.The Horstmann's that I looked at had just the name stamped in the blade.
    As far as the Star of David goes... ITS NOT!!!
    This is a quote from Mr Richard Wilkinson Latham on SFI.
    The triangle has been known/used as a sign of strenth. So to put 2 triangles on the blade Mean's "Its twice as strong"
    I've got a coastal artillery uniform from the earlly 1900's with horstmann buttons. they did make a lot of metal goods for the military.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    here's a link Horstmann

  5. #5

    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    Pretty sweet information. It is nice to know I have a damascus sword! I wish I knew when it was assembled there. Thanks for the info.

    Brent

  7. #7

    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    Quote by SAho7 View Post
    Pretty sweet information. It is nice to know I have a damascus sword! I wish I knew when it was assembled there. Thanks for the info.

    Brent


    Hi Brent.

    Your sword is not of damascus. It is made of plain steel.

    Damascus blades exhibit a series of patterns within the metal itself that are caused by using two or more types of steel that are hammered and beaten together many thousands of times by the bladesmith during the forging process, similar to the wayv in which authentic Samurai swords are made - each of these patterns is entirely unique and different from any other.

    Genuine swords of damascus steel are also extremely rare and expensive and would not normally be found on NCO blades.





    Regards,





    Steve.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    I must be misunderstanding the article I am quoting from the site listed above.
    "As best we can tell, the specification for the six-pointed star is historical in nature and was likely used to signify that the blade was manufactured using the Damascus steel method. Today, there is no requirement for Damascus steel blades; however, the six-pointed "Proved" star is required in the etch to signify that the blade meets the current military specifications. Even this use has lost its meaning, however, since replica swords intended only for wall-mounting incorrectly bear the symbol."

    Brent

  9. #9

    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    Yes, more than likely design elements carried over from a much older time to modern-day swords, within the last 200 years or so.

    The hilt pattern is also different from US Marine Corps swords I've seen, which are currently of Mameluke or Persian style like British "General Officers" sabres of the Victorian era (1822 to @1900). This one looks like types I've seen - imported from Europe - possibly made around the turn of the last century or later.

    You could get a repro scabbard, as an original may be tough to find.


    It is a beautiful sword you have, with or without a scabbard !




    Regards,




    Steve.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Marine NCO sword identification, scabbard search

    I have searched a few times for information on this sword. I have not found anything with a picture that I can compare to. I also cannot find the horstmann maker mark like the one on the blade. I see many navy swords, not any Marine Corps. I would really like to know who carried it. lol

    Brent

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