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Camouflage netting

Article about: some of th ephotos of the artillary pieces under netting, seem to be essentially worthless. Is this just my ignorance,but can a 100X100mm netting really decieve an observer? Same thing with

  1. #11

    Default Re: Camouflage netting

    some of th ephotos of the artillary pieces under netting, seem to be essentially worthless. Is this just my ignorance,but can a 100X100mm netting really decieve an observer?

    Same thing with the assistant MGunner, withthe netting "shawl"- do these really do anything? for that matter, what good was netting over a helmet- it doesn't seem to reduce shine, or really change the shape, at least not some of the large nettings used by Japanesse, German and US. I can see hte British two color, small hole netting changing the shape of the brodie style.

    Forgive my ignorance, I was a submariner, and being 30+meters under is GREAT camo!
    Jagdhorn

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  3. #12

    Default Re: Camouflage netting

    Netting on a helmet, in, and of itself is of limited use, you are correct. The net makes adding local foliage easier, and as you move, you can quickly adapt your actual camo (what you stick in the netting), by pulling out what no longer applies, and sticking in what now does.

    As to covering arty, armor, and even tents, the real purpose of netting is to break up the obvious silhouette of the item. Keep in mind, during the GPW, all recon by aircraft was done by modified fighters, who were in a hurry to get in, and out (because to get the cameras, they lost guns). Once back on their home airfield, the camera pod was unloaded, and the film processed, then sent to the interpreters. All this took time, and by the time they figured out you had been their, you no longer were. If fighter, or attack aircraft, such as a Stuka is hunting for a target, he isn't going to waste bombs, and ammo on what looks like a clump of bushes. So, all you have to do is deceive a pilot for the few seconds he has to observe you, and decide whether you are worth making a run on. Trust me, he isn't happy about getting shot at, so he isn't going to waste a lot of effort, unless he is pretty sure you are worth the effort to attack. If you look more like a clump of bushes, than you do an artillery piece, he is likely to pass you by. Cammo netting during the GPW had limited effect against ground observation. If an FO could sit, and look at the target area, you were in trouble. Netting is more for aerial observation, than ground, and that precious few seconds a pilot had to determine the value of what he observed as he flew past at 300+ MPH.

    Boridin

  4. #13

    Default Re: Camouflage netting

    thanks. I have no real life experience with netting. YOur cmments are helpful as they both sound rightm and reinforce what I suspcted. Still the 4th picture of the lasrge size nettingm withthe artillary tube point almost at a 60-70 degree angle, in the middle of the netting, no scrim, makes me wonder how useful this netting would be against even fast aircraft. (I also have never been in a recon aircraft,, so
    I am really VERY ignorant in this area.) I also suspect that anything is better than nothing.
    thanks again
    Jagdhorn

  5. #14

    Default Re: Camouflage netting

    Quote by jagdhorn View Post
    I also suspect that anything is better than nothing.

    Jagdhorn
    Precisely!

    Boridin

  6. #15
    ?

    Default Re: Camouflage netting

    Been reading a bit... Early in the war troops were issued a personal camo net .75 M x 1.5 M (roughly 30" by 60"). Net hole size was 3cm x 3 cm (1-1/4" x 1-1/4").
    It appears that this it what the troops are wearing in the photo in post #2 and post #9 and perhaps in the second photo in post #6.
    These personal nets were supposed to be decorated with twigs, grass and leaves to be effective. They were also used to conceal the embrasures in a fuly developed individual fighting positions as shown in the field manuals.

    There was also a camo sheet issued that was similar to the grass camo suits with rafia grass tufts tied to the sheet. Post #6 shows one of these in photo #3.

    Tim

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