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Leather boots

Article about: Forum, How about a little help dating these. I just picked these up because they were a reasonable size, condition, and look for uniform display. Typical Soviet leather outer with white leat

  1. #1

    Default Leather boots

    Forum,

    How about a little help dating these. I just picked these up because they were a reasonable size, condition, and look for uniform display. Typical Soviet leather outer with white leather inner. Leather soles and stacked leather heels.

    Comments please
    Attached Images Attached Images     

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  3. #2

    Default Re: Leather boots

    They are probably post war, but are very similar to war time production style.

    They look like Cavalry/Officer style boots, as they are the taller/lined boot. the infantry boot was shorter, and rarely had a lining.

    If you want to use this for a uniform display, then the display should be for an Officer, or a Cavalryman/Mounted rifles of any rank.

    It appears that the boots are a size 43, which is roughly U.S. 10.5

    I also notice that the boots have heel cleats, and toe clips, therefore, I suspect they are Cavalry boots, rather than general Army issue, since cleats, and toe clips were included in the shoe repair kits issued to Cavalry regiments, but were not included in the general repair kit, to the best of my knowledge.

    If you have any further questions, feel free to ask!

    Boridin

  4. #3

    Default Re: Leather boots

    Yes, officer's boots for sure. Cav versus infantry officers? Impossible to tell. Your repair kit information seems counter intuitive... Why would a cav boot have steel plates in the repair kit and the infantry not? The infantry boot would be more likely to wear out in these areas and require more robust reinforcement. Regardless it is more likely that these elements were added for the stylish sound they make when walking on paved surfaces.

    Generally speaking, most Soviet boots (regardless of branch of service) that have leather uppers are lined with this white kid leather. The archetype Soviet EM infantry boot does not have a leather upper, but an impregnated canvas one instead. Period boots of this style are all but impossible to find.

    I was just curious if maybe I got lucky on the era. I picked them up due to the period look of the leather soles and stacked heels as opposed to more modern rubber.

  5. #4

    Default Re: Leather boots

    It is my understanding that the smooth leather sole is already very slippery, and the cleats, and toe clips make them even more slippery. Since infantry are on their feet, and Cavalry tend to be mounted, the goal of the cleats/toe clips had less to do with durability, as it did the clicking sound. (I know I loose my balance in my boots from time to time, and I do not have cleats/toe clips)

    I have only seen one Cavalry boot repair set. It has the clips, and cleats, but no hobnails. The one infantry kit I used to own had no cleats, or toe clips, but did have hobnails.

    I am assuming, and yes I know the danger of assumption, but I am assuming this was for some reason.

    Boridin

  6. #5

    Default Re: Leather boots

    Quote by Wesley's Dad View Post
    Yes, officer's boots for sure. Cav versus infantry officers?
    In mounted branches (Cavalry, and Mounted Rifle Regiments), everyone wore the tall boot. This had more to do with protecting the flanks of the horse, than it did with comfort of the troopers. Remember that the horse is State property, so protecting the horse was important.

    Boridin

  7. #6

    Default Re: Leather boots

    I'd say tall boots has more to do with cavalry tradition and protection of the legs below the knee from passing brush and branches than protecting the horse.

    Interesting that this infantry repair kit you speak of had hobnails. I wonder if they were simply misplaced German items because the archetype Soviet boot has no hobnails.

  8. #7

    Default Re: Leather boots

    Quote by Wesley's Dad View Post
    I'd say tall boots has more to do with cavalry tradition and protection of the legs below the knee from passing brush and branches than protecting the horse.

    Interesting that this infantry repair kit you speak of had hobnails. I wonder if they were simply misplaced German items because the archetype Soviet boot has no hobnails.
    Well it was in a Red Army issue box. All the little bags had Cyrillic, as did all the tools, and the instructions were in Cyrillic.

    Perhaps it was produced for the Germans, by the Soviets, but...

    You may be correct that tradition played a part in the tall boots, but I know it also had to do with care of the mounts. After all, what is it that makes a Cavalryman special, over ALL other branches?








    HIS HORSE!

    Without his horse, he is nothing more than a lightly armed, and poorly equipped infantryman.

    Boridin

  9. #8

    Default Re: Leather boots

    These boots arrived yesterday. Still no clue as to wartime/postwar vintage. Possible either way... Both boots have the factory mark shown in the photos. Each boot is named on both sides inside the shaft under each pull straps to a Feldwebel Renner. Interesting, but not much help.

  10. #9

    Default Re: Leather boots

    Well both the Red Army, and The German military would use, and issue captured enemy equipment, so it is possible that a German soldier took these boots, and used them.

    It is also possible that they were issued through the NVA.

    Hard to say!

    Boridin

  11. #10

    Default Re: Leather boots

    I thought it might be nice to see a comparison of commercial riding boots, and the standard Red Army issue riding boots.

    First picture is a comparison of the two styles



    Next is a detail shot of the shaft, and throat of the commercial boots.



    Here you can see the common wear pattern of boots worn for riding. The wear is caused by the rubbing of the saddle flap, and stirrup leathers on the inside of the boot shaft.



    This is a picture of the throat markings inside the shaft of the left issue boot.



    Now, the throat markings inside the shaft of the right issue boot. You will note, that somewhere in their respective lives, these two boots were separated from their original partner, as the two boots are NOT from the same manufacturer.



    Enjoy the comparison!

    Boridin

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