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Brace yourselves! Comparison of Pattern 1937 Webbing Braces from across the Empire.

Article about: I've always wanted to write a book detailing the differences in Empire-produced Pattern 1937 webbing. Like any good reference book, it would have lots of detailed color photos. Although I ca

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    Default Brace yourselves! Comparison of Pattern 1937 Webbing Braces from across the Empire.

    I've always wanted to write a book detailing the differences in Empire-produced Pattern 1937 webbing. Like any good reference book, it would have lots of detailed color photos. Although I can't write the book, I can still post a few pictures in that style.

    The following figures show most of the known types of Pattern 1937 webbing braces (sans Australian and Indian 3 inch wide braces)...click on the pictures to see more detail.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    (a) Australian - feature a shoulder flare made of two pieces of thin, single weave webbing sandwiching the end of the 1" straps
    (b) South African (S.A.P.A.W. Type) - feature a 1" strap along the entire length of the shoulder flare
    (c) South African (D.I. Fram Type) - constructed of multiple pieces of thin webbing held together with multiple layers of stitching
    (d) Indian - the 1" straps are sewn onto the shoulder flare, similar to the British economy pattern
    (e) Canadian - late war style (from 1942 on) feature a 1" strap covered by a tube of webbing to form the shoulder flare
    (f) Canadian - early war style similar to the original British pattern, but features stitching at the end of the flare in the shape of a trapezium
    (g) British - late war style (from 1943 on) feature a tubular webbing flare folded and sewn to separate 1" straps
    (h) British - economy style employed by firms incapable of reduction weaving, made of separate 1" straps sewn to a 2" webbing flare
    (i) British - flattened tube of thin, single weave webbing spread out in the center to create the shoulder flare
    (j) British - original pattern made out of one continuous pieces of webbing using reduction weaving


    Click image for larger version. 

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    (a) Australian - made by A.F. in 1944 and featuring the D↑D Department of Defence mark
    (b) South African - made by South African Proofing and Weaving Company (Party), Limited of Johannesburg in 1943
    (c) South African - made by Daniel Isaac Fram & Company, Limited of Johannesburg and featuring the Union Broad Arrow mark
    (d) Indian - made by Bata Shoe Company Private, Limited of Batanagar in 1943 and featuring an Indian C↑## mark
    (e) Canadian - made by Zephyr Loom & Textile, Limited of Guelph, Ontario in 1943 and featuring the Canadian Broad Arrow
    (f) Canadian - made by Zephyr Loom & Textile, Limited of Guelph, Ontario in 1942 and featuring the Canadian Broad Arrow
    (g) British - made by Mills Equipment Company, Limited of London in 1944 and featuring a Broad Arrow
    (h) British - made by Associated Cutters (1938) Limited in 1941 and featuring a Broad Arrow
    (i) British - made by Mills Equipment Company, Limited of London in 1940 and featuring a Broad Arrow
    (j) British - made by Mills Equipment Company, Limited of London in 1940 and featuring a Broad Arrow

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    Amazing study, true dedication, and very well done!

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    Excellent. Thank you.

    Cheers, Ade.
    Had good advice? Saved money? Why not become a Gold Club Member, just hit the green "Join WRF Club" tab at the top of the page and help support the forum!

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    Again a top notch thread!

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    Brilliant as ever, if you ever write that book sign me up for a copy! Just to add to the thread, this is the 37 pattern shoulder brace in 'ersatz' canvas, dated 1942 and made by Caoutchouc Products Ltd:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Full article here: https://hatchfive.wordpress.com/2015...houlder-brace/

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    I think there is a book out on webbing called "Tangled Web"

    Dean O
    Canada

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    Nice spot Warspite, I was wondering if you'd catch that those ersatz items seem to date from 41 to 42.

    You're right about Tangled Web Dean, but I don't think that book covers all of the Empire patterns. I think It focuses mainly on Canadian webbing.

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    Karkee, yes it might only look at Canadian webbing, however over here when the companies that were making it, they used what ever they had to complete it.
    I bought about 200 shovel carries, all Canadian, all made the same year by the same company

    A few had all Brass fittings, some had a mix of steel and brass fittings and some were all steel fittings...not to mention the some of the steel fittings were bare steel and most were painted in different colours and different shades of colours...it truly goes on and one...and that's just one Commonwealth Country....a true book on all 37 Pattern webbing would be 3 inches thick....and of course some of the smaller providers, with the way they did things, would be considered "fakes or modern repros"
    We do not know it all and we never will when it comes to 37 pattern webbing.
    I think this is a very interesting area..and should be really looked into

    But Lad, if you want to write a book about it, then all the power to you...we need a basic guide to this mess, however there are those 2 book experts that will try to shoot you down, and you may make mistakes...but hell we have to start somewhere, and I would buy your book...and help you anyway I could...I am sure of members here would be willing to help.
    The most important thing in research is a common point of reference....then we go from there

    Again, just my thoughts

    Dean O
    Canada

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    And another oddity! Reduction woven shoulder brace in RAF blue grey by Martin Wright & Sons Ltd, but dated 1973 and with a NATO stores number stamped on:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    You make a lot of excellent points Dean! There was considerable variation even within the same manufacturer and I have learned to never say words like "all" and "always". With that said, there were some observable trends among the different commonwealth countries. I put together a couple of other posts on the Canadian forum that detail Canadian and British webbing.

    Field Guide to British P37 Webbing Modifications (with pictures)

    Field Guide to Canadian P37 Webbing Modifications (with pictures)

    Regarding your Canadian entrenching tool carriers, I have only seen undated Hugh Carson Ltd carriers with brass fittings and 1943 ZL&T LTD Carriers with battle brass fittings. Do you remember any of the details of the ones that fell outside of those two categories?

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