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British MkIII Service Respirator

Article about: This afternoon I received a parcel from Dan McArthur who goes by the name RetroRespirators on this, and various other forums. Inside was a mask that has been at the top of my most wanted lis

  1. #11

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    I've been photographing my collection using a new set up, a bit of a mammoth task but I am almost there! I thought I'd share this photo, it certainly looks better on a head than pancaked on the floor!

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    Thanks,

    Danny

  2. #12

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    you can see the transition between these Mk III's and the early Mk IV's, I have a Mk IV with the red/pinky rubber under the stokingette covering, has the Mk III type eye pieces painted green which differ from the later aluminium easily removable ones, and an early Mk "II" mouth piece (also have a mask with Mk "IV*" mouth piece and a few with Mk "V" mouth pieces.) I would love a Mk III but they are as rare as rocking horse poop, fantastic find with that one!
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #13

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    sorry about the quality of the pictures.

  4. #14

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    Thanks for sharing the images, these early orange rubber MkIVs are very few and far between in such good condition. For some reason that particular type of rubber doesn't appear to have stood the tests of time very well.

    These early MkIVs existed in many variations, the earliest examples being made in orange rubber as previously shown. The first models also had the exhale valve guard secured by a small nut secured by a very small split pin, which was later changed to the more familiar cone shaped nut used on all subsequent MkIVs and MkVs.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    MkIV with EA Filter as used by the BEF, this one is made from orange rubber and features the nut and split pin on the exhale valve guard.

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    MkIV in its standard configuration, again made from orange rubber but with the later cone shaped nut.

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    MkIV, identical the one above but made from black rubber.

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    MkIV, again made with black rubber but with a longer tube. These were mainly used by the Royal Navy.

    Regards,

    Danny

  5. #15

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    I thought this photograph might be of interest, it shows members of the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry (FANY) wearing MK III respirators, presumably in the 1930s.Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #16

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    Thanks for sharing your photograph, definitely an interesting one! I'd concur with it being from the 1930s, as the MkIII was issued to other organisations when it was withdrawn from military service and replaced by the MkIV, the transition was completed fully by around 1936 if I remember rightly.

    Regards,

    Danny

  7. #17

    Default From my collection

    .

  8. #18

    Default From my collection



    - - ------- - -

    ..
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  9. #19

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    Now that is certainly an oddity! Never seen, let alone heard of such a piece. I've seen an example of a MkIII with the Type E MkIV Filter before, but the addition of the EA filter in the middle of the is very unusual indeed as this modification was almost exclusively made to the MkIV respirators used by the British Expeditionary Force. By the time these modifications were made the MkIII was already obsolete and used only for training purposes, so your example is certainly a bit of a mash up of parts!

    What markings are on the mask itself (dates, manufacturer etc)?

    Thanks very much for sharing!

    Danny

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