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british ww2 gas mask.

Article about: Interesting thread, great info on how to properly display gas masks and how to prevent further deterioration. Most things are like previously stated, down to common sence but i hadnt thought

  1. #11

    Default Re: british ww2 gas mask.

    Interesting thread, great info on how to properly display gas masks and how to prevent further deterioration.

    Most things are like previously stated, down to common sence but i hadnt thought about using Power Steering fluid.

    Cheers-

    Darren

  2. #12
    ?

    Default Re: british ww2 gas mask.

    One final word on P.A.S. if your going to use this technique, I would advise that you try a small test area first before going all the way and treating the whole mask, as due to the time frame of world war two gas mask's the rubber used in some is natural base and in others synthetic and so I would experiment first before getting too carried away, just incase it makes things worse rather than better.

    However I have tried this on a 1940 natural rubber British Civilian duty respirator, and had very similar results, I. E clean pliable and with a soft sheen after treatment.

    Nige.
    "Now, I've designed this like a collapsing bag ! "

  3. #13

    Default Re: british ww2 gas mask.

    I've heard of the method that Nige mentioned, never tried it before but it sounds really good based on whats been said and that fantastic example of a M1-1-5 Army Optical Mask which has been preserved and shown I'm actually tempted to try it myself now as a few of the masks I have could do with a bit of resoration Anyway, as Nige said it would be best to try it on a small area of the mask first, just like you would when stripping non original paint from an old helmet to make sure you get it just right

    I'll post some pictures of how to display the masks in the way that I mentioned in a previous post in the next while.

    Thanks

    Danny

  4. #14

    Default Re: british ww2 gas mask.

    Heres some pictures of what I was meaning by using pins to take the strain off the head harness and prevent it from stretching and deteriorating any further. Hope fully it gives you a better idea of what I meant

    Thanks

    Danny
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  5. #15

    Default Re: british ww2 gas mask.

    good thread with much useful info,,,

  6. #16

    Default Re: british ww2 gas mask.

    I treated the mask with the p.a.s.f
    Now the rubber is very soft and clean.some small cracks dissapeared and from a small distance the mask looks like new.Thanks for the method.I will keep in mind.
    First you have to apply sometimes and clean it with a dry cloth to clean the rubber.After that you have to apply the fluid with a cloth and leave it.You will see that the rubber will "drink" the fluid.I have repeat that for 5-6 times.

  7. #17

    Default Re: british ww2 gas mask.

    Quote by Nige H View Post
    You can also try Power Assisted Steering fluid as this is designed to lubricate and preserve the rubber hoses on a cars steering system, P.A.S. actually contains some of the active volatile compounds found in rubber and neoprene and helps to replenish these components back into the rubber surface, it works in a similar way to treating leather with a food or cream to re-hydrate the hide. As already mentioned the main reason rubber perishes is U. V. exposure and heat, this draws out the volatile compounds which rubber naturally contains and intern oxidises the surface and turns its into an unstable matt and chalky like layer. The P.A.S. should be sparingly applied with a paint brush to both sides of the rubber (if possible) and then left for no more than two hours, once the fluid has had time to be absorbed into the surface, take a piece of clean lint free cloth which has been dipped in fresh P.A.S. and then start to wipe the mask and tubes, you will notice the cloth becomes black very quickly, this is in fact the surface oxide coming away from the mask. Repeat this procedure until the cloth remains clean, then take a fresh dry cloth and wipe the mask all over and then leave to dry for several days, at first you will find the mask has a slight sticky feel too it, just like new rubber but this will soon go. Also I found in the past that the rubber becomes more flexible and less prone to cracking, in fact although it will not fix perished areas, I found that these age related wounds in the surface will actually start to close up and be less noticeable.

    Well here's the proof,


    My M1-1-5 Optical gas mask was as stiff as a board, and white with mildew when I got it, having spent most of its life packed into its issue bag with our seeing the light of day. The mask has been treated twice in this way since I've owned it, with the last treatment being over eighteen months ago, and as can be seen the rubber still retains its natural sheen (photo taken yesterday for my other thread). The mask is also stored out of direct sunlight as per GasmasksUK's recommendations, at an average room temperature and is well ventilated, plus its stored exactly as seen in the picture.

    Finally PLEASE do not use Petroleum jelly, silicone or mineral oil, these will not help and will make things much worse as none are compatible with rubber and will in fact have adverse effects on its properties, P.A.S. was designed specifically to be in contestant contact with rubber and is therefore why I'd only ever use this type of oil/fluid. But do not over treat the mask, especially if applying to both sides, or you'll make the rubber become spongy, and thus more prone to damage in the already wreaken areas, until the rubber starts to dry out once again. Oh I forget to say P.A.S. stinks and has a burn arid smell, do this restoration work ether up the shed on in the garage.

    Nige
    New member here.
    I saw your post about this gas mask, when it was all hard and had cracks.
    I was searching for that post, and I can't find it...
    Can I see how bad the mask's condition was? I have a Soviet PMG that needs fixing, and it's got a bad tear on the left ear.
    It's bad... :/

  8. #18

    Default Re: british ww2 gas mask.

    Quote by xxviiith View Post
    I have a Soviet PMG that needs fixing, and it's got a bad tear on the left ear. It's bad... :/
    Theres unfortunately not much that can be done about tears, just be careful so it doesn't get any worse. PMG's are quite common on the surplus market, so you should be able to find a replacement one quite easily.

    Thanks and welcome to the forum

    Danny

  9. #19

    Default Re: british ww2 gas mask.

    Quote by GasMasksUK View Post
    Theres unfortunately not much that can be done about tears, just be careful so it doesn't get any worse. PMG's are quite common on the surplus market, so you should be able to find a replacement one quite easily.

    Thanks and welcome to the forum

    Danny
    Hmmm... Sad... I'm from the Philippines, and where I'm from. EVERYTHING IS HARD TO GET. Anyways... I'm getting new gas masks for my birthday, though I'm not sure if they will be bought. Anyways. Thanks for the warm welcome! Fluid works great. Though the mask will only be good for displays, I was kind'a hoping I could still be able to play around with it, use it also for exploration adventures... lol

  10. #20

    Unhappy Re: british ww2 gas mask.

    Another question... Does repairing a mask with PASF (SchMs) repair the cracks completely? Like, it can be used???
    - I got too impatient with my repair with the PMG, so I patched it up with latex glove cut-out patches and used cyanoacrilate as an adhesive.

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